Culver City Animal Services

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Frequently Asked Questions

Where is Culver City Animal Services located?

Culver City Animal Services is located in the Culver City Police Department on 4040 Duquesne Avenue between Culver Boulevard and Jefferson Boulevard in Culver City. Culver City Animal Services utilizes the spcaLA Hawthorne shelter for sheltering services.

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What are the hours of operation for Culver City Animal Services?

There is one full-time Culver City Animal Services Officer who routinely patrols and handles field calls from 9:00 am to 8:00 pm on Monday through Thursday. However, to accommodate special events and certain field services, the days and hours may fluctuate to best suit the needs of the residents of Culver City. With only one full-time Culver City Animal Services Officer and a call volume of approximately 15 to 35 phone calls a day, calls and activities must be handled in order of priority and the Culver City Animal Services Officer is frequently in the field to handle calls.

When the Culver City Animal Services Officer is off-duty, Los Angeles County Animal Control Officers are on stand-by duty to respond to calls such as injured animals, bites, confined animals and trapped wildlife. You can call at 310-253-6143 for general information, license questions, report lost and found animals, or obtain assistance with animal-related issues. For immediate or emergency field services, please call the Culver City Non-Emergency Police Line at 310-837-1221. If the Culver City Animal Services Officer is in the field or on-duty, the call will be dispatched to the Animal Services Officer. If the Culver City Animal Services Officer is off-duty, the call will be redirected to the Los Angeles County Animal Control.


How do I reach Culver City Animal Services?
You can reach Culver City Animal Services via telephone at 310-253-6143 or via e-mail at animal.services@culvercity.org.

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What services do you provide?
The Culver City Animal Services Officer is responsible for field operations. Field operations enforce all state, county, and municipal laws regarding the care and control of domestic animals. The field services provided by the Animal Services Officer are the following:

  • Patrol the city on a daily basis
  • Enforce all animal control laws
  • Investigate all reports of animal abuse
  • Investigate all reports of animal nuisance
  • Pick up stray animals
  • Pick up deceased domestic animals and wildlife
  • Respond to animal-related emergencies
  • Transport injured or sick stray animals and wildlife to receive emergency vet care (day or night)
  • Follow-up on citizen complaints
  • File bite reports and quarantine rabies suspect animal
  • Promote responsible pet ownership through education
  • Rescue animals in distress
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Can the Animal Services Officer remove animals from my attic, in my crawlspace, under my deck or under the house?
There are some situations involving animals that cannot be handled by the Culver City Animal Services Officer due to the threat of injury. Some services we cannot provide include climbing into attics, going under structures, and climbing or scaling up trees. In these situations, you should contact a licensed private nuisance wildlife control operator or pest removal specialist of your choosing to remove the animal and you will be responsible for any cost incurred.top

How does Culver City Animal Services prioritize calls?
With only one full-time Culver City Animal Services Officer and a call volume of approximately 15 to 35 phone calls a day, all calls and activities must be handled in order of priority. Hence, Culver City Animal Services gives priority to situations that are involving the public health and safety of a person or an animal. Loose aggressive dogs, biting animals at large, injured or sick stray animals, possible cruelty situations, and dogs running in heavy traffic or schoolyards are responded to before deceased animals (unless location is causing a traffic hazard) and nuisance barking concerns. How quickly the Culver City Animal Services Officer responds to a specific call depends not only upon the priority of the call, but how many calls of a higher priority are occurring at that time. For example, calls involving immediate injury or harm to a person from an animal or an injured animal are the highest priority. Conversely, calls regarding a dog running loose in the neighborhood without posing a threat and barking dogs generally take much longer to respond to for service.


 

Documents and information:

Please click on the categories on the left and questions on the right below for more information.

What is the animal public nuisance complaint procedure?

1. Contact the Culver City Animal Services Department at 310-253-6143 or at animal.services@culvercity.org to initiate a first complaint.

  • Have the address of the nuisance animal in question.
  • Provide your name and address.
    • (NOTE: Your name and address will remain confidential at this point.)

     

2. The Animal Services Officer will issue an Initial Warning Notice to the animal owner.

  • The animal owner will be granted a ten (10) day period.
  • The original animal nuisance complaint will remain on file and active for thirty (30) days after the initial ten (10) day correction period.
  • If a second complaint is not received from the original complainant in thirty (30) days, the complaint shall expire and the complainant must begin the process again if another violation is observed from the same animal.

3. Contact the Culver City Animal Services Department at 310-253-6143 or at animal.services@culvercity.org  to initiate a second complaint if the problem has not been corrected in ten (10) days. You will be provided the Declaration of Animal Public Nuisance and the Petition for an Administrative Hearing.

4. Complete the Declaration of Animal Public Nuisance and the Petition for an Administrative Hearing.

 

  • MANDATORY: Mail or deliver the completed and signed Declaration of Animal Public Nuisance (Page 3) to the nuisance animal owner.
  • MANDATORY: Mail or deliver the completed and signed Declaration of Animal Public Nuisance (Page 4) and Petition for an Administrative Hearing to:

Culver City Animal Services   

4040 Duquesne Avenue

Culver City, CA 90232

 

(NOTE: At this point, it is necessary that you submit your name and address to the animal owner.)

 

5. An Administrative Hearing will be scheduled where you will have the opportunity to present your evidence and witnesses to support your claim of a public nuisance. As the complainant, you may want to provide the following as evidence that there has been a violation of the public nuisance ordinance. 

a. Written documentation/log of the date, time and duration of the animal noise.

b. Video recordings of the animal noise (please state the time, date and location at the beginning of the video).

c. Written statements or declarations from unrelated neighbors from different households.

 

This brochure provides the step-by-step explanation of the https://www.culvercity.org/home/showdocument?id=12942.

 

What constitutes a nuisance animal or a barking dog?

Animal ownership is welcomed within Culver City; however, strong emphasis is placed on responsible ownership of animals. Animal owners are encouraged to respect the rights of their fellow residents and also those of their animals. Primary responsibility is placed upon animal owners to properly train and/or secure their animals so as to prevent them from causing injuries and/or creating nuisances.

Barking dogs, whining puppies, chirping pet birds, and squawking pet birds are all examples of noise found in major urban areas. Understandably, certain noise levels must be tolerated by all residents in order for normal functions of urban life to continue. However, excessive, unnecessary, and/or annoying noise is subject to regulation. The nuisance animal ordinance states that it is illegal for any animal to bark, howl, yelp, bay, or make any sounds common to the species, in a manner that disturbs the peace of the neighborhood.

Undoubtedly, it is unusual and difficult for an Animal Services Officer to witness or verify an offense of this nature in person. The Animal Services Officer does not live in the neighborhood and is unable to dedicate hours or days at a residence to observe for a nuisance violation. The enforcement of the nuisance ordinances depends on different variables existing at the time of the Animal Services Officer's investigation. The totality of the evidence and reasonable interpretation of the nuisance ordinance must be considered to determine whether the behavior would meet the threshold of “nuisance” and a violation [Culver City Municipal Code 9.01.035 and 9.07.030]. Supportive documentation, written logs, video and audio recordings, and other neighbor testimonies provided by the complainant will also assist in this determination. Violations are subject to citations with fines up to $500.

Based on experience, research and training, these examples constitute the majority of the nuisance complaint and demonstrate nuisance violations:

  1. Unprovoked animal barks every a minute for several hours during the day
  2. Unprovoked animal barks for approximately 30 seconds then stops for approximately a minute and then starts barking again for approximately 25 seconds and then stops for approximately two minutes and then starts barking again when unprovoked
  3. Unprovoked animal barks continuously non-stop for 5 minutes

 

Is the animal public nuisance complaint procedure anonymous?

This is not an anonymous procedure and Declarations of Animal Public Nuisance will not be accepted anonymously. Your contact information as a complainant is required on the Declaration of Animal Public Nuisance. If it is not provided, we will be unable to assist you.  

As the complainant, you may want to provide supportive evidence that there has been a violation of the public nuisance ordinance.  Anonymous complaints do not provide the ability for further contact and therefore cannot provide supportive evidence as required for investigation. The complainant must go on record as the person who is disturbed by the animal nuisance.  Filing a complaint begins a formal proceeding against the owner of the animal(s).

 

What qualifies as supportive evidence and documentation of an animal public nuisance complaint?

As the complainant, you may want to provide the following as evidence that there has been a violation of the animal public nuisance ordinance.

  1. Written documentation/log of the date, time and duration of the animal noise.

     

  2. Video recordings of the animal noise.
    • Please include the date, time and location at the beginning of the video.

     

  3. Written statements or declarations from unrelated neighbors from different households.

Do the service animals have to be quiet and not bark?

The ADA requires that service animals be under the control of the handler at all times. In most instances, the handler will be the individual with a disability or a third party who accompanies the individual with a disability. The service animal must be harnessed, leashed, or tethered while in public places unless these devices interfere with the service animal's work or the person's disability prevents use of these devices. In that case, the person must use voice, signal, or other effective means to maintain control of the animal. Under control also means that a service animal should not be allowed to bark repeatedly in a lecture hall, theater, library, or other quiet place. However, if a dog barks just once, or barks because someone has provoked it, this would not mean that the dog is out of control.

For a flyer on more information from the ADA: https://www.culvercitypd.org/Home/ShowDocument?id=12958

 

My dog barks all the time. What can I do?

As a dog owner, you know the companionship, loyalty, love and fun that your dog adds to your life, but you must also realize your responsibility toward your neighbors. Excessive barking can be a source of great irritation for neighbors as well as those who have to live with a noisy dog. The security of knowing you have a real watchdog, as well as enjoying a peaceful and quiet neighborhood, is well worth the effort. Barking is a natural behavior for dogs. However, excessive barking is often a sign that something may be `wrong.’

The first step in solving the problem is to determine why your dog is barking excessively:

1. Your dog is bored, lonely or frustrated due to a lack of company, exercise, or mental stimulation. If left in the backyard for long periods, barking may be an enjoyable way for dogs to pass the time. Dogs are also social pack animals and may suffer from anxiety when left alone.

  • Walk your dog at least 2 to 3 times daily. Include your dog on family outings.
  • Find a designated off-leash area to give your dog a free run.
  • Make the backyard environment more interesting.
  • Take an obedience class with your dog and practice what you learn regularly to provide mental stimulation for the dog.
  • Provide fun toys, such as indestructible hollow toys stuffed with snacks, to keep your dog busy when you’re not home.
  • Ensure that your dog has fresh water, a balanced diet, and adequate shelter from the weather. If possible, give your dog access to the house through a dog door.

2. Your dog is alerting or warning you of a perceived threat, such as animals, postal workers, noises, or the movements outside of your property.

  • Teach your dog a “quiet” command.
  • Desensitize your dog to the stimulus that triggers the barking, if possible.
  • Keep stray animals and wildlife off your property. Devices and repellants, such as a motion-sensored sprinkler device, specific plants, and metal bands and metal funnel guards around trees are effective in deterring wildlife.
  • Block your dog’s view of movement with solid fencing, shade cloth or hedging.
  • If children are teasing your dog, try to discuss the problem with them.
  • Establish another internal fence to restrict your dog’s access to the stimulus.
  • Create a setting in which your dog will not feel that territorial urge to defend itself.

3. Your dog is afraid of something.

  • Identify what is frightening your dog. Remove or desensitize him to the stimulus.
  • Mute outside noise by leaving your dog in a comfortable area in a basement or bathroom and leave a television, radio or fan on.
  • Block your dog’s access to outdoor views that might be causing a fear response.

4. Your dog is suffering from separation anxiety.

  • Teach your dog the sit-stay and down-stay commands using positive reinforcement to help your dog remain calmly in one place while you go to another room.
  • Desensitize your dog to the stimulus that triggers the barking.
  • Don't make a big deal out of arrivals and departures. When you arrive home, ignore your dog for the first 10 minutes and then calmly pet your dog.
  • Leave an article of dirty laundry that smells like you, such as a shirt that you've slept in, to lend a calming olfactory cue.
  • Utilize an over-the-counter calming product that may reduce fearfulness in dogs.
  • Consult a professional animal behavior specialist or trainer for assistance.

5. Your dog has an injury or health problem.

  • Make sure that your dog is in good health, by taking your dog to the veterinarian for regular check-ups.
  • Ensure that your dog has fresh water, a balanced diet, and adequate shelter from the weather. If possible, give your dog access to the house through a dog door.

Remember that training takes time and persistence. NEVER hit or strike your dog. This will not address the problem and will likely create confusion and fear in your dog. Devices such as anti-bark static (electrical) correction or citronella spray collars are available at many stores and online. Spraying water from spray bottles can help break your dog’s focus, but don’t spray directly into your dog’s face. Spray at the hindquarters as the point is as a distraction. If you need help with dog training, ask your veterinarian for advice. You can also look under ‘Dog Training’ in the yellow pages.

For a brochure on how to address your barking dog: https://www.culvercity.org/home/showdocument?id=12948

My neighbor's dog barks all the time. What do I do?

You can submit a complaint via telephone at 310-253-6143, via e-mail at animal.services@culvercity.org, or via fax at 310-253-6217 (Please ensure to attention: Culver City Animal Services). Please leave your contact information so that we can follow-up and gather more information for our investigation. If the Culver City Animal Services Officer observes a violation at the time of the visit, appropriate action will be taken. Because most animal ordinances are considered infractions, the Culver City Animal Services Officer cannot take any legal action unless the Officer actually witnesses a violation in progress. This does not mean nothing can be done about a violation. Residents can provide supportive evidence, photographs, video recordings, and documentation regarding a complaint to:

Culver City Animal Services
Culver City Police Department
4040 Duquesne Avenue
Culver City, California 90232

Residents can also e-mail the information or complaint to:

animal.services@culvercity.org

For a brochure on the nuisance complaint procedure: https://www.culvercitypd.org/home/showdocument?id=12942

Can I move an active bird nest? It is in an inconvenient place.

The Migratory Bird Treaty Act of 1918 protects more than 800 birds in North America. The Act protects birds in a wide variety of ways, and that includes their nests. It’s illegal to interfere with an “active nest,” which is defined by California Fish and Wildlife as one that contains eggs or young birds, or is in the process of being built and is capable of holding eggs or young birds (about 1/3 to 1/2 complete) [California Fish and Wildlife Code 3503].

If you come across a bird nest in your yard that has eggs, or see a female sitting on the nest, your options are legally pretty limited, no matter how inconvenient it might be for you. If the nest absolutely must be moved, you’ll need to contact a local rescue organization. Such organizations have or can obtain permits to deal with the situation. Please note that under the law, it is not legal to simply move the nest to another location in your yard. (Additionally, it’s unlikely the parent birds will continue to use it – it will abandon the eggs and try to build another nest.)

 

My complex is conducting a seasonal removal of branches and maintenance of trees. I'm concerned about the bird nests. What are the laws regarding this?

Under the United States Code Title 16, Chapter 7, Subchapter II, the Migratory Bird Treaty Act of 1918,  it is unlawful to pursue, hunt, take, capture, kill or sell birds listed therein ("migratory birds"). Under the California Fish and Wildlife Code 3503, it is unlawful to take, possess, or needlessly destroy the nest or eggs of any bird. These statutes prohibit the removal of all listed species or their parts (feathers, eggs, nests, etc.) from such property. 

Nesting season for birds are usually from April through June. It is recommended to prune and tree-trim in the autumn and winter seasons. The time required for a bird to complete its nesting cycle varies by species, but most birds have active nests for only 2 to 4 weeks. The California Department of Fish and Wildlife defines an "active" nest as one that contains eggs or young birds, or is in the process of being built and is capable of holding eggs or young birds(about 1/3 to 1/2 complete). Postponing the cutting or trimming of trees could address this issue with a relatively short delay.

 

When can I legally move a bird nest?

The Migratory Bird Treaty Act of 1918 protects more than 800 birds in North America. The Act protects birds in a wide variety of ways, and that includes their nests. It’s illegal to interfere with an “active nest,” which is defined by California Fish and Wildlife as one that contains eggs or young birds, or is in the process of being built and is capable of holding eggs or young birds (about 1/3 to 1/2 complete) [California Fish and Wildlife Code 3503].

The only times you can legally move a bird nest are before it gets too far along (a few materials such as sticks to about 1/3 complete) and when the birds are done nesting. Most birds take several days to build a nest, so if you catch it early, go ahead and remove it. Then, find a way to block off the area so the birds don’t return. It’s not uncommon for some species to re-use their nests, whether in the same season or the following year. Sometimes, other species will move in after the original builders have left. And the nest parts may even be scavenged by other birds for building their own nests. Whenever possible, just leave an old bird nest where you find it. If you have to move it, be sure the birds are gone, there are no babies or eggs, and no new birds have moved in. 

 

Birds are swooping and "dive-bombing" the area. What can I do?

The Migratory Bird Treaty Act of 1918 protects more than 800 birds in North America. The act protects birds in a wide variety of ways, and that includes their nests. Like most animals, hawks and other swooping birds instinctively protect its territory, particularly during breeding time. The birds are protecting their nests, eggs or young birds from potential intruders. Most birds will swoop within 100 to 150 feet of its nest. Its territory may include your backyard, the park across the road or the local schoolyard. If the bird perceives you to be a potential threat, it may swoop. The likelihood of an attack is increased if it is teased or feels threatened in any way.

Birds use scare tactics to defend its territory:

  • Swooping is the most common defense behavior. The birds’ aim is to threaten or bluff and the intention is only to ward off intruders.
  • Beak clacking is part of its defense strategy.
  • In a strike attack, a hawk usually swoops, hovers momentarily and then strikes. The fluttering of wings as the bird hovers can be a warning to duck your head to avoid the attack.

Ways to avoid swooping that may work

  • Avoid the swoop area – try walking or riding in a different direction.
  • Cyclists should always wear a helmet. It is better to dismount and walk your bike past a swoop area.
  • Put up warning signs for others who may not be aware that there are swooping birds in the area.
  • Travel in a group. Most birds only swoop individuals.
  • Be confident and face a swooping bird; usually the bird only attacks people facing away from it.
  • Do not panic and run. It will only encourage a swooping bird to continue its attack.
  • Wear a hat in an area where there are swooping birds.
  • Erect a pop-up tent over the area to prevent contact by the swooping bird.
  • Holding a stick or umbrella over your head will often cause the bird to keep its distance.

 

Can I have a chicken in Culver City?

The City of Culver City and Culver City Animal Services have restrictions on the types of animals that can be kept in the city. Before acquiring any animal other than a dog or cat, be sure to check with Culver City Animal Services to make sure you can legally keep the animal in your neighborhood. Generally speaking, the following are illegal: all poisonous snakes and reptiles including alligators and similar animals; all primates; all bears; all California state prohibited non-native animals including ferrets, hedgehogs, sugar gliders, monkeys, and Quaker parakeets; all wild or exotic cats including hybrids; all wild canines and hybrids such as wolf crosses; and all wild native and exotic animals such as raccoons, skunks, otters, opossums, bats, deer, and antelopes. You may be approved for an exotic animal or a non-domestic animal under certain circumstances for certain species or breeds only if there are no prior complaints on your animals, if you meet all the requirements for the Animal Permit, and if the Culver City Permit Application is officially approved [Culver City Municipal Code 9.01.025]. It shall be unlawful for any person to keep or maintain, or have in possession or under control, any animals, fowl or reptiles, other than household pets, in Culver City, without having applied for and received an officially approved Culver City Animal Permit. The Culver City Animal Permit shall be revocable at any time it is made to appear to the City Council that the keeping of such animals, fowl or reptiles is, or may become, detrimental to the public health safety, and/or general welfare [Culver City Municipal Code 9.01.015]. You will need to apply for a Culver City Animal Permit Application to determine if the animal you are interested in will be permitted.

Application for permit

  • All applications for permits to keep animals, fowl or reptiles shall be filed with the City Clerk, shall be accompanied by a fee of $50.00 and shall state the number and kind of animals, fowl or reptiles as well as such other information required by the City Clerk. Signatures of at least 1 adult resident of each dwelling or apartment unit within a radius of 200 feet, indicating approval or disapproval, shall be appended to such applications. Upon receipt of application, a copy thereof shall be referred to the Culver City Animal Services for investigation and report.
  • Upon receipt of said reports, the City Clerk shall cause notices to be posted within a radius of 200 feet from the address wherein said animals, fowl or reptiles are proposed to be kept, and not more than 50 feet apart. Permit will be granted providing no written objections are filed within ten days and approval is received from the City's health agency and Police Department.

You can obtain the Culver City Animal Permit online:

https://www.culvercity.org/Home/ShowDocument?id=12940

You can complete a Culver City Animal Permit application in person at:

City of Culver City - City Hall
9770 Culver Boulevard
Culver City, California

* City Hall hours are from 7:30 am to 5:30 pm Monday through Friday.
* City Hall is closed on holidays, weekends, and alternating Fridays.

You can request a Culver City Animal Permit application at:

Culver City Animal Services
Culver City Police Department
4040 Duquesne Avenue
Culver City, California 90232

Residents can also e-mail the information or complaint to:

animal.services@culvercity.org

 

My cat/dog attacked a bird. What do I do?

Any bird that has been caught or attacked by a dog or cat must receive specialized care. Cats and dogs have bacteria (germs) in their mouths that will cause a bird to die, usually within 3 days, if left untreated. Call the Culver City Animal Services at 310-837-1221. The baby bird will be transferred to a licensed wildlife rehabilitator or a veterinary hospital.

Is it true that if I touch a baby bird, the mother bird will abandon the baby bird?

It is NOT TRUE that if you touch a baby bird its mother will reject or abandon it. Most birds do not have a strong sense of smell and will not reject their young. If it is safe to do so, put the fallen nestling bird back in its nest or carry a fledgling bird out of danger and place it in a tree or shrub.

Can't I just move the duck and ducklings out of my pool and into a nearby pond or the La Ballona Creek?

No, ducks are protected under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act of 1918. Therefore, it is illegal for any person to capture, possess or relocate ducks and other migratory birds without proper state and federal permit. If the ducks and ducklings are injured, call Culver City Animal Services at 310-837-1221 and they can be safely transported to a licensed wildlife rehabber or veterinary hospital. People who mean well will sometimes make the mistake of gathering up the family and releasing them in nearby park ponds and lakes. Unfortunately, as soon as the male ducks spot the family, they may be attacked.

What if I find an orphaned duckling?

Ducklings are rarely abandoned by the mother duck, who may be watching from a distance until the you leave the area. Ducklings spend long periods of time alone. The mother duck feeds them only a few times a day. You are unlikely to see her unless you are watching closely. It is best to leave the baby duckling alone unless it is in immediate danger. If the mother was seen recently, wait it out for an hour and see if she comes back.

If the ducklings are beginning to scatter, or you're not sure how long they've been alone, put a plastic laundry basket over them, upside down, to contain them while waiting for the mother to return. She will see them through the lattice sides of the basket and make contact. If she returns, slowly approach and overturn the basket so she can collect her young.

Do NOT let the duckling get wet! When ducklings get wet, ducklings must get under their mother who will then shed her protective oils onto her ducklings which will dry them. Ducklings have no feathers with barbicels that provide a waterproof barrier and therefore, no drying oils. A duckling's down absorbs water like a sponge. This wet down will quickly tire the duckling which can lead to the duckling drowning or succumbing to hypothermia. Once they are fully feathered, about 30-45 days after birth, ducklings are safe to be in water without their mother.

If you are certain the mother duck has been killed or hurt, immediately put the duckling in a warm, dark, and quiet place where it will not be disturbed, such as a box with a soft lining. Place the box on a heating pad on a low setting and call the Culver City Animal Services at 310-837-1221. The duckling will be transferred to a licensed wildlife rehabilitator or a veterinary hospital.

Wild birds are protected under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act of 1918 and it is illegal for any person to capture, possess or relocate ducks and other migratory birds without proper state and federal permit. You must be a licensed facility and a licensed rehabilitator to have a wild bird in your possession for more than 24 hours. Licensed wildlife rehabilitators have been trained to care for injured, sick, or abandoned wildlife birds; under these highly specialized training, the baby birds will be raised to be wild and will be returned to their natural environments when they are ready. As tempting as it may be, the majority of the birds which are cared for by well-meaning, but untrained people for more than 24 hours usually die as a result of improper diet, low temperature regulation, and aspiration.

Ducklings fell through a sewer grate. What do I do?

Do NOT enter the sewer to rescue the ducklings. Sewers can often fill with lethal and toxic methane fumes and without the right equipment, you can place yourself in serious harm. Call the Culver City Animal Services Officer who has the resources and contacts to accomplish a safe rescue of the ducklings at 310-837-1221. Please be as specific as possible on the location to ensure that the Animal Services Officer can locate the ducklings.

What if I see ducks crossing a busy street?

The sight of a duck or goose family walking along or trying to cross a busy road is a frequent occurrence during nesting season, particularly in urban areas. Almost invariably, such families are heading for a body of water where the young can be raised. The water source may not be obvious, but geese and ducks choose their nesting sites to ensure water will be within several yards of the nest.

Although it may seem the ideal solution to capture and relocate the birds to a water source, chasing a healthy duck or goose family will usually cause the adults to fly away and the babies to scatter which can cause greater harm than no action at all and should be avoided unless absolutely necessary. Unfortunately, predation is natural and ducklings have very poor survival odds. A mother duck can have two clutches of up to 15 baby ducklings per year, but only one or two per year might make it to adulthood. People who mean well will sometimes make the mistake of gathering up the family and releasing them in nearby park ponds and lakes. Unfortunately, as soon as the male ducks spot the family, they may be attacked.

Wild birds are protected under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act of 1918 and it is illegal for any person to capture, possess or relocate ducks and other migratory birds without proper state and federal permit. You must be a licensed facility and a licensed rehabilitator to have a wild bird in your possession for more than 24 hours. Licensed wildlife rehabilitators have been trained to care for injured, sick, or abandoned wildlife birds; under these highly specialized training, the baby birds will be raised to be wild and will be returned to their natural environments when they are ready. As tempting as it may be, the majority of the birds which are cared for by well-meaning, but untrained people for more than 24 hours usually die as a result of improper diet, low temperature regulation, and aspiration.

Your own health and safety is of paramount importance. Please do not put yourself at risk in trying to help geese or duck families.

Is the chlorine in my pool safe for ducks?

The chlorinated water in the pool is not harmful for ducks, ducklings and other waterfowl when used as directed. Please ensure that the waterfowl don't get sucked into any pool vents underwater.

Ducklings are stuck or drowning in my pool. What can I do?

Although ducklings may look like competent swimmers, ducklings' abilities are limited early in life. The smooth lip feature of the pool can prevent ducklings from exiting the pool and the ducklings can either drown or succumb to hypothermia.

Use one of two options to help them out:

  1. Add water to the pool until it overflows. Ducklings should be able to walk out once the water level is even with the side of the pool.
  2. Provide a makeshift ramp. It can be fashioned from lighter, floating materials such as the lid of a Styrofoam cooler or a floating cushion from a deck chair. (If the ducklings do not use the ramp  immediately, throw a few of these floating objects into the water so the ducklings at least have a means of getting out of the water until the ducklings can be removed or can locate the ramp.) If heavier materials such as wood are used, the end of the ramp sitting in the water can be made to float by attaching an empty soda bottle to its underside. To enable the ducklings to walk on it, the ramp should enter the pool at an angle of 45 degrees or less. If you drape a wet towel on the ramp, it will provide traction for the ducklings.

If the ducklings do not find the ramp or swim to the edge of the filled pool within an hour (or sooner if they begin to appear weak), use a pool skimmer or other long object to gently herd them in the appropriate direction.

There are ducks/ducklings in my pool. Why are the duck and ducklings there and how do I get them to leave?

Mother ducks do not have their babies in ponds or lakes because male ducks (drakes) are very aggressive. A mother duck must find a safe nesting place to birth and raise her young away from other ducks, including your pool. The mother will move her young when they are older and less vulnerable. Ducklings can not fly until they are roughly 8 weeks of age. Therefore, the duck must go on foot wherever she wants to take her babies. This means crossing the busy street and in traffic. The duck and ducklings will likely stick around if there is plenty of water and food available. Please leave the ducks alone and do NOT put out food for the duck or ducklings, because it is important that they leave the area in search of better habitat. The ducks should move on eventually.

The best solution is to leave them alone, as long as the ducklings are able to get out of the pool. The mother will move her young when they are older and less vulnerable. If you must evict them, go to your local party store and buy silver mylar balloons containing cartoon faces on them with big eyes, and attach heavy weights to the string. Put the balloons around the perimeter of the entire pool, about every 20 feet. The balloons will bob in the breeze and make the ducks nervous. To enhance the harassment effect, you can also float a beach ball in the pool or use an electric boat. Try floating colored objects such as kid's toys or inflatables in the pool. If that doesn't discourage them, a pool cover will do the trick. Be careful not to use anything with rope or strings that can entangle or strangle a duck.

There are duck and ducklings in a dangerous or undesirable place. What should I do?

Ducks commonly nest in perplexing spots, such as in backyards with barking dogs, on cement islands in the middle of parking lots or on the sidewalk of a busy intersection. Although these nests may fall prey to cats, dogs, or human malice, these ducks tend to choose nesting sites that allow them to see potential threats approaching the nest such as areas that are flat and where visibility is good. In urban and suburban landscapes, the areas that best fit this bill are often those that have been manufactured or maintained by humans.

The nesting process is a relatively short process with an incubation period of approximately 3 to 4 weeks. After which point, the duck will walk the ducklings away from the nesting area and to the closest water source, on foot. This process may seem dangerous but it is part of the normal development for ducks.

Ducks are protected under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act of 1918 and it is illegal for any person to capture, possess or relocate ducks and other migratory birds without proper state and federal permit. You must be a licensed facility and a licensed rehabilitator to have a wild bird in your possession for more than 24 hours. Licensed wildlife rehabilitators have been trained to care for injured, sick, or abandoned wildlife birds; under these highly specialized training, the baby birds will be raised to be wild and will be returned to their natural environments when they are ready. As tempting as it may be, the majority of the birds which are cared for by well-meaning, but untrained people for more than 24 hours usually die as a result of improper diet, low temperature regulation, and aspiration.

If the ducks or ducklings are injured or deceased, contact Culver City Animal Services at 310-837-1221.

What defines a potentially dangerous dog versus a vicious dog?

Per the Los Angeles County Code 10.37.020, a potentially dangerous dog is defined as any of the following:

  1. Any dog which, when unprovoked, on two separate occasions within the prior 36-month period, engages in any behavior that requires a defensive action by any person to prevent bodily injury when the person and the dog are off the property of the owner or keeper of the dog.
  2. Any dog which, when unprovoked, bites a person causing a less severe injury than as defined in Los Angeles County Code 10.37.040.     
    • "Severe Injury" is defined as any physical injury to a human being that results in muscle tears or disfiguring lacerations or requires multiple sutures or corrective or cosmetic surgery.
  3. Any dog previously determined to be and currently listed as a potentially dangerous dog which, after its owner or keeper has been notified of this determination, continues the behavior described in Los Angeles County Code Section 10.37.040.

 Per the Los Angeles County Code 10.37.030, a vicious dog is defined as any of the following:

  1. Any dog that engages in or has been found to have been trained to engage in exhibitions of fighting.
  2. Any dog which, when unprovoked, in an aggressive manner, inflicts severe injury on or kills a human being.
  3. Any dog previously determined to be and currently listed as a potentially dangerous dog which, after its owner or keeper has been notified of this determination, continues the behavior described in Los Angeles County Code 10.37.020 or is maintained in violation of Los Angeles County Code 10.37.130.

A potentially dangerous dog has to be registered as such. Then the potentially dangerous dog has to be kept indoors or in a securely fenced yard from which it cannot escape, and into which children cannot trespass. When off the owner's property, it has to be restrained by a substantial leash and under the control of a responsible adult. A potentially dangerous dog declaration will impose conditions upon the ownership of the dog to protect the public. A dog determined to be a vicious dog may be destroyed when it is found, after proceedings conducted under Los Angeles County Code 10.37.110, that the release of the dog would create a significant threat to the public health, safety and welfare. If it is determined that a dog found to be vicious shall not be destroyed, the judicial authority shall impose the conditions upon ownership of potentially dangerous dogs required by Los Angeles County Code 10.37.130, the conditions required by this section, and any other conditions necessary to protect the public health, safety, and welfare [Los Angeles County Code 10.37.140].

For a Guide to the Potentially Dangerous or Vicious Dog Declaration: https://www.culvercitypd.org/Home/ShowDocument?id=12966

 

Are vicious dogs allowed in Culver City?

A dog determined to be a vicious dog may be destroyed when it is found, after proceedings conducted under Los Angeles County Code 10.37.110, that the release of the dog would create a significant threat to the public health, safety and welfare. If it is determined that a dog found to be vicious shall not be destroyed, the judicial authority shall impose the conditions upon ownership of potentially dangerous dogs required by Los Angeles County Code 10.37.130, the conditions required by this section, and any other conditions necessary to protect the public health, safety, and welfare [Los Angeles County Code 10.37.140].

My animal bit someone. What do I do?

The bite must be reported by calling Culver City Animal Services at 310-837-1221. The animal must be placed in quarantine for a period of 10 days. This quarantine is required even if the animal has been vaccinated for rabies. You may be able to keep the animal at your home under certain circumstances and only if the license and rabies vaccination are current. After the bite report is completed, Animal Services or Los Angeles County Public Health will follow up on the observation and release the animal from quarantine at the end of the quarantine period. It is your responsibility as the animal owner to prevent your animal from being a hazard to the community. You, as the responsible animal owner, are expected to be vigilant in preventing your animal from biting anyone. You, as the owner of any animal, are liable for the damages suffered by any person who is bitten by your animal while in a public place or lawfully in a private place, including your property as the owner of the animal [California Civil Code 3342]. If medical treatment is required, the doctor or hospital providing the treatment should report the incident. Every attempt should be made to identify the victim so that the necessary paperwork completed.

I've been bitten by an animal. What should I do?

If you or any family member are bitten, call the Culver City Animal Services at 310-837-1221 or 911 immediately. The Culver City Animal Services Officer will respond to complete the paperwork and based on the circumstances, quarantine the biting animal. All animal bites must be reported. This is a matter of public health. The enforcement of these regulations is the responsibility of the Culver City Animal Services. Any dog or cat who bites a human must be placed in quarantine for a 10-day period and cannot be removed from Culver City unless permission is granted by Culver City Animal Services during this period. If medical treatment is required, the doctor or hospital providing the treatment should report the incident. Every attempt should be made to identify the animal so the owner can be contacted and the necessary paperwork completed.

My neighbor has an aggressive dog. What do I do?

You can submit a complaint via telephone at 310-253-6143, via e-mail at animal.services@culvercity.org, or via fax at 310-253-6217 (Please ensure to attention: Culver City Animal Services).

If the Culver City Animal Services Officer observes a violation or the aggressive behavior at the time of the visit, appropriate action will be taken. To assist in the investigation, residents can also provide supportive evidence, photographs, video recordings, and documentation regarding a complaint to:

Culver City Animal Services
Culver City Police Department
4040 Duquesne Avenue
Culver City, California 90232

Residents can also e-mail the information or complaint to:

animal.services@culvercity.org

What is a rabies quarantine?

A rabies quarantine is a mandatory period of isolation and observation where the animal suspected of being involved in a bite or rabies exposure can be watched to determine if there is any danger of the animal transmitting the rabies virus [California Code of Regulations, Title 17, Section 2606(b)(3)].

What regulation provides you the authority to quarantine my pet?

California Code of Regulations, Title 17

Section 2606. Rabies, Animal.

(a) Reporting. Any person having knowledge of the whereabouts of an animal known to have or suspected of having rabies shall report the facts immediately to the local health officer. The health officer shall likewise be notified of any person or animal bitten by a rabid or suspected rabid animal. The local health officer shall be notified when any person is bitten by an animal of a species subject to rabies, whether or not the animal is suspected of having rabies.

(b) Isolation. Any rabid animal, clinically suspected rabid animal, or biting animal shall be isolated in strict confinement as follows:

(1) Isolation of Rabid Animals or Clinically Suspected Rabid Animals. Any rabid animal or clinically suspected rabid animal shall be isolated in strict confinement under proper care and under the observation of a licensed veterinarian, in a pound, veterinary hospital, or other adequate facility in a manner approved by the local health officer, and shall not be killed or released for at least 10 days after the onset of symptoms suggestive of rabies, with the exception that such animals may be sacrificed with permission of the local health officer for the purpose of laboratory examination for rabies using the fluorescent rabies antibody (FRA) test in an approved public health laboratory.

(2) Isolation of Biting Animals. Any animal which bites or otherwise exposes a person shall be isolated in strict confinement in a place and manner approved by the local health officer and observed for at least 14 days (dogs and cats 10 days) after the day of infliction of the bite.

(3) Isolation of Biting Animals in Officially Declared Rabies Areas. In officially declared rabies areas, the isolation described in paragraph (2) above shall be mandatory for any animal of a species subject to rabies that has bitten or otherwise exposed a person, with the exception of rodents (members of the order Rodentia) and rabbits and hares (members of the order Lagomorpha).

Where is my pet quarantined? Where is the shelter?

If your pet was impounded for rabies quarantine at the shelter, your pet will be housed in a quarantine section of the spcaLA Hawthorne shelter.

spcaLA Hawthorne Shelter
12910 Yukon Avenue
Hawthorne, CA 90250
310-676-1149

Open to the Public:
Wednesday through Sunday: 10:00 am - 5:00 pm
Closed Monday, Tuesday and Holidays

How does my pet clear the rabies quarantine at the spcaLA Hawthorne shelter?

The rabies quarantine may be released if the veterinarian or Los Angeles County Public Health Officer certifies that your pet has exhibited no signs of rabies during the 10-day quarantine period.

How long is the rabies quarantine of my pet?

Your pet is rabies quarantined for 10 days from the date of the infliction of the bite. If your pet was quarantined at the shelter, the spcaLA Hawthorne Shelter is open to the public on Wednesday through Sunday. If the rabies quarantine period completes on a public holiday, Monday or Tuesday, your pet will be eligible for release from the shelter on the following business day.

How do I get my pet back after the rabies quarantine is complete at the spcaLA Hawthorne shelter?

If your pet was rabies quarantined at the spcaLA Hawthorner shelter, you will need to contact the shelter at 310-676-1149 regarding the details and procedure to redeem your pet. You are responsible for all applicable fees associated with the care of your pet while your pet is at the shelter. These non-negotiable fees include, but are not limited to, impound, daily feed and care, vaccination, pet licensing, and required veterinary care fees.

Why can’t my pet be tested for rabies instead?

Rabies is an unusual virus because it never enters the blood stream. Rabies travels along the nerves from the site of infection, the bite, into the brain, and then concentrates in the salivary glands. This brain infection is why you see unusual behavior in rabid animals. This method of travel makes the specific rabies virus undetectable in a live animal because rabies is diagnosed only by examining the brain microscopically and immunohistochemically (using rabies antibody) to demonstrate the presence of the virus. Therefore, the animal must be deceased before rabies testing is done.

Why can’t I just revaccinate my pet instead of having my pet quarantined?

Vaccination against rabies is discouraged during the quarantine period to avoid confusing vaccination reactions with symptoms of rabies. Unvaccinated pets should not receive a rabies vaccine until the quarantine period has ended. Revaccination of your pet after the bite does not provide protection for the possible rabies exposure to the person at the time of the bite.

I don’t believe that my pet bit anyone. Why does my pet have to be quarantined?

In the interest of public health and the fact that rabies is a fatal disease, any reported bite or possible rabies exposure must be treated as valid and true.

My pet is healthy and doesn't have rabies. Why does my pet have to be quarantined?

You might not know if your pet has had contact with a rabid animal. You are not with your pet 24 hours a day. A contact could be, for instance, from a rabid bat in the middle of the night. Once bitten, the rabies virus makes its way to the brain of your pet and multiplies in the brain. You may not see any signs of rabies in your pet at this point, but it is able to spread the virus. This quarantine period avoids the need to immediately destroy the biting dog or cat in order to test its brain for the rabies virus [California Code of Regulations, Title 17, Section 2606(b)(2)].

 

 

My pet is vaccinated against rabies. Why does my pet have to be quarantined?

 No vaccination is 100% effective. The law requires that the biting animal be quarantined after any reported animal bite to human [California Code of Regulations, Title 17, Section 2606(b)(3)].

Why was my biting pet quarantined?

Rabies is a fatal transmissible viral disease that can be passed to people by the bite of an infected animal through its saliva. As a result, specific rabies quarantine procedures have been mandated by the state and local laws and must be followed in the event of a bite or rabies exposure. These procedures exist to protect the bite victim, the owner of the dog, and the general public from the threat of rabies. Any dog or cat that bites a person and causes a break to the surface of the skin with its teeth must be quarantined for 10 days [California Code of Regulations, Title 17, Section 2606(b)(2)].

How can you help us resolve difficult problems when an Officer does not observe a violation?

If the Culver City Animal Services Officer observes a violation at the time of the visit, appropriate action will be taken.  To assist in the investigation, residents can provide supportive evidence, photographs, video recordings, and documentation regarding a complaint to:

Culver City Animal Services
Culver City Police Department
4040 Duquesne Avenue
Culver City, California 90232

Residents can also e-mail the information or complaint to:

animal.services@culvercity.org

I was issued an Administrative Citation by the Culver City Animal Services Officer. What do I do?

The citation is issued when the Culver City Animal Services Officer observes a violation of the Culver City Municipal Codes or other applicable codes and laws[Culver City Municipal Code Chapter 1.02]. The amount of the administrative fine being imposed upon you for the violation(s) is listed on the front of the Administrative Citation. The fine is due and payable within 15 days of the date issued. These fines are cumulative and citations may be issued every day the violation exists [Culver City Municipal Code 1.01.035]. If you continue or repeat the commission of the Municipal Code violation listed on the Administrative Citation, the City may issue to you another citation or the City may pursue other legal remedies available to the City against you. Any failure to pay to the City on or before the due date may result in the matter being referred for collection, which includes but is not limited to the filing of a small claims court action. The City may collect any past due administrative fine or late payment charges by use of any available legal means, including property lien procedure set forth in the Culver City Municipal Code.

Fines for Administrative Citations:

  • First citation is $100.
  • Second citation is $200.
  • Third and subsequent citations are $500.

Payment of Fines:

  • Make checks, cashier's checks or money orders payable to: "City of Culver City" for the total amount due and pay your citation by mail or in person at:

City of Culver City - City Hall
Finance Department
9770 Culver Boulevard
Culver City, California 90232

* City Hall hours are from 7:30 am to 5:30 pm Monday through Friday.
* City Hall is closed on holidays, weekends, and alternating Fridays.

For questions regarding this citation, please call 310-253-5940.

Where do I go to pay a fine for an Administrative Citation/ticket?

The citation is issued when the Culver City Animal Services Officer observes a violation of the Culver City Municipal Codes or other applicable codes and laws[Culver City Municipal Code Chapter 1.02] . The amount of the administrative fine being imposed upon you for the violation(s) is listed on the front of the Administrative Citation. The fine is due and payable within 15 days of the date issued. Make checks, cashier's checks or money orders payable to: "City of Culver City" for the total amount due and pay your citation by mail or in person at:

City of Culver City - City Hall
Finance Department
9770 Culver Boulevard
Culver City, California 90232

* City Hall hours are from 7:30 am to 5:30 pm Monday through Friday.
* City Hall is closed on holidays, weekends, and alternating Fridays.

For questions regarding this citation, please call 310-253-5940.

What is an appeal hearing?

 An appeal hearing is a formal hearing conducted by a Hearing Officer to accept testimony, under oath, from all interested parties when a determination of violation validity has been appealed. If you are issued an Administrative Citation and you believe that it was issued in error, you have the right to contest an Administrative Citation and request a hearing before a Hearing Officer by completing and filing a Request for Hearing within 15 days from the date of the issuance of the Administrative Citation. However, there are acceptable grounds for an appeal. Unacceptable grounds of appeal of a citation will result in a determination that the citation is upheld and the forfeiture of your deposit.

The administrative appeal process includes three levels of appeal:

  1. Administrative Review
  2. Administrative Hearing
  3. Appeal through the Superior Court

For the Administrative Review and Hearing, there are acceptable grounds for an appeal. Unacceptable grounds of appeal of a citation will result in a determination that the citation is upheld and the forfeiture of your deposit.

The following are acceptable grounds of appeal of a citation:

  • No violation of the Culver City animal regulation(s) was committed. (Example: You were cited for your dog off-leash, but your dog was on leash.)
  • You were not the individual indicated on the Administration Citation who committed the violation. (Example: You were cited for your dog running at large, but you don't own any dogs.)

The following are not acceptable grounds for appeal of a citation:

  • Lack of knowledge of the Culver City animal regulations (Example: You were cited for your dog off-leash on your unfenced front lawn, but you state that you did not know that you weren't allowed to have your dog off-leash if your own property is not fenced in.)
  • Disapproval with the Culver City animal regulations (Example: You were cited for your dog in Tellefson Park, but you don't think that dogs should not be allowed in Culver City parks.)

For questions regarding this citation, please call 310-253-5940.

Can I appeal a ticket? What are the grounds for an appeal?

You have the right to contest an Administrative Citation and request a hearing before a Hearing Officer by completing and filing a Request for Hearing within 15 days from the date of the issuance of the Administrative Citation. The request must be accompanied by an advance deposit of the fine or a completed Request for Advance Deposit Hardship Waiver Form. If paying the penalty in advance causes a financial hardship the citizen may complete an Advance Deposit Hardship Waiver Form. Please note that the Advance Deposit Hardship Waiver Form does not waive your deposit of the fines. It is to assist if you intend to request a hearing but are financially unable to submit the deposit of the fine at the time of the request. If the hearing Officer upholds the Administrative Citation, you are still responsible for the fines.

You must submit the Request for Hearing and the advance deposit (or Hardship Waiver Request) within 15 days from the date of the issuance of the Administrative Citation by mail or in person at:

City of Culver City - City Hall
Enforcement Services Division
Second Floor
9770 Culver Boulevard
Culver City, California 90232

* City Hall hours are from 7:30 am to 5:30 pm Monday through Friday.
* City Hall is closed on holidays, weekends, and alternating Fridays.

Any failure to submit the Request for Hearing, and the advance deposit (or Hardship Waiver Request) within the 15 days of the date of the Administrative Citation shall constitute a waiver of the right to a hearing.

You will be notified of the date and time set for your hearing. A hearing will not be scheduled unless the full amount of the fine is deposited or the City approved the Advance Deposit Hardship Waiver request. If you fail to appear at your hearing, the hearing will proceed without you and you will have been deemed to waive your right to an administrative hearing. This failure will also result in a forfeiture of your deposit of the Administrative Fine and will constitute a failure to exhaust your administrative remedies. If your appeal is successful, your deposit will be refunded.

The administrative appeal process includes three levels of appeal:

  1. Administrative Review
  2. Administrative Hearing
  3. Appeal through the Superior Court

For the Administrative Review and Hearing, there are acceptable grounds for an appeal. Unacceptable grounds of appeal of a citation will result in a determination that the citation is upheld and the forfeiture of your deposit.

The following are acceptable grounds of appeal of a citation:

  • No violation of the Culver City animal regulation(s) was committed. (Example: You were cited for your dog off-leash, but your dog was on leash.)
  • You were not the individual indicated on the Administration Citation who committed the violation. (Example: You were cited for your dog running at large, but you don't own any dogs.)

The following are not acceptable grounds for appeal of a citation:

  • Lack of knowledge of the Culver City animal regulations (Example: You were cited for your dog off-leash on your unfenced front lawn, but you state that you did not know that you weren't allowed to have your dog off-leash if your own property is not fenced in.)
  • Disapproval with the Culver City animal regulations (Example: You were cited for your dog in Tellefson Park, but you don't think that dogs should not be allowed in Culver City parks.)

For questions regarding this citation, please call 310-253-5940.

What is an Advance Deposit Hardship Waiver? Do I still need to pay for the fines if I am granted the waiver?

You have the right to contest an Administrative Citation and request a hearing before a Hearing Officer by completing and filing a Request for Hearing within 15 days from the date of the issuance of the Administrative Citation. The request must be accompanied by an advance deposit of the fine or a completed Request for Advance Deposit Hardship Waiver Form. If paying the penalty in advance causes a financial hardship the citizen may complete an Advance Deposit Hardship Waiver Form. Please note that the Advance Deposit Hardship Waiver Form does not waive your deposit of the fines. It is to assist you if you intend to request a hearing but are financially unable to submit the deposit of the fine at the time of the request. If the hearing Officer upholds the Administrative Citation, you are still responsible for the fines. If the Hearing Officer renders a decision in favor of the City, you must comply with the administrative order, including payment of any administrative penalty. A decision by the Hearing Officer in your favor shall constitute a dismissal of the administrative penalty and you then do not owe the fees. Any person who contests the final administrative order may seek judicial review of the order by filing an appeal with the Superior Court.

What is animal cruelty?

Animal cruelty encompasses a range of behaviors harmful to animals, from neglect to malicious killing. Most cruelty investigated is unintentional neglect that can be resolved through education. Intentional cruelty can run the gamut from knowingly depriving an animal of food, water, shelter, or veterinary care to maliciously torturing, maiming, mutilating, or killing an animal [California Penal Code 597.1]. Inflicting inhumane pain or suffering or failing to provide veterinary care also constitutes animal cruelty.

Violations should be reported by calling Culver City Animal Services at 310-837-1221 or via e-mail at:

animal.services@culvercity.org

Should I report animal cruelty if I suspect it?

Yes. Animal cruelty is against the law, and certain acts of animal abuse are also considered felonies. It is important to report a suspected animal abuse crime. Do not worry if you cannot “prove your case.” The job of the Animal Services Officer is to investigate suspicious activities. Your report, even if it is not “complete,” is useful evidence that will help the Animal Services Officer determine the facts and the need for further action.

Provide as much detail as you can: location, time, description of perpetrator(s), number of times incident occurred, types of animals involved. Take notes of what you observe. If you can do so without risking personal injury, take a photo or video of the animal—either while it is happening or after. Provide the names and contact information of other witnesses, if there are any.

If the Culver City Animal Services Officer observes a violation or signs of a crime, appropriate action will be taken.  To assist in the investigation, residents can provide supportive evidence, photographs, video recordings, and documentation regarding a complaint to:

Culver City Animal Services
Culver City Police Department
4040 Duquesne Avenue
Culver City, California 90232

Residents can also e-mail the information or complaint to:

animal.services@culvercity.org

I think that my neighbor is hoarding animals. What do I do?

Animal hoarding is a complex and intricate public health and community issue. Its effects are far-reaching and encompass mental health, animal welfare and public safety concerns.

The following criteria are used to define animal hoarding:

  1. More than the typical number of companion animals such as cats and/or dogs
  2. Inability to provide even minimal standards of nutrition, sanitation, shelter and veterinary care, with this neglect often resulting in starvation, illness and death
  3. Denial of the inability to provide this minimum care and the impact of that failure on the animals, the household and human occupants of the dwelling

If you think someone you know is struggling with animal hoarding, you can submit a complaint via telephone at 310-253-6143, via e-mail at animal.services@culvercity.org, or via fax at 310-253-6217 (Please ensure to attention: Culver City Animal Services).

If the Culver City Animal Services Officer observes a violation or the cruelty incident at the time of the visit, appropriate action will be taken. Because most animal ordinances are considered infractions and misdemeanors, the Culver City Animal Services Officer cannot take any legal action unless the Officer actually witnesses a violation in progress. This does not mean nothing can be done about a violation.

To assist in the investigation, residents can provide supportive evidence, photographs, video recordings, and documentation regarding a complaint to:

Culver City Animal Services
Culver City Police Department
4040 Duquesne Avenue
Culver City, California 90232

Residents can also e-mail the information or complaint to:

animal.services@culvercity.org

My neighbor is not taking care of his pets. What do I do?

You can submit a complaint via telephone at 310-253-6143, via e-mail at animal.services@culvercity.org, or via fax at 310-253-6217 (Please ensure to attention: Culver City Animal Services). If the Culver City Animal Services Officer observes a violation or conditions that qualify as animal cruelty at the time of the visit, appropriate action will be taken. To assist in the investigation, residents can provide supportive evidence, photographs, video recordings, and documentation regarding a complaint to:

Culver City Animal Services
Culver City Police Department
4040 Duquesne Avenue
Culver City, California 90232

Residents can also e-mail the information or complaint to:

animal.services@culvercity.org

There is a dog locked in a car. Is that illegal?

Depending on the manner and time frame, it may be illegal. Dogs in parked cars are at risk in hot and inclement weather. In the summer, the heat in an enclosed vehicle can reach 145 degrees or higher in a matter of minutes and the heat can kill a dog. Owners can be punished for leaving a dog in a car, under anti-cruelty statutes or laws that specifically forbid leaving a dog in a parked vehicle under conditions that endanger the health or well-being of an animal due to heat, cold, lack of adequate ventilation, or lack of food or water, or other circumstances that could reasonably be expected to cause suffering, disability, or death to the animal [California Penal Code 597.7]. Violations should be reported by calling Culver City Animal Services at 310-837-1221.

Abbreviated

 

My neighbor ties his dog up every day. Is that illegal?

Depending on the manner and time frame, it may be illegal. It is illegal for a person to "tether, fasten, chain, tie, or restrain a dog, or cause a dog to be tethered, fastened, chained, tied, or restrained, to a dog house, tree, fence, or any other stationary object" for a period of more than 3 hours within a 24 hour period. [California Health and Safety Code 122335]. The leash, rope, or chain shall be affixed in such a manner that it will prevent the animal from becoming entangled or injured and will permit the animals's access to adequate shelter, food and water [California Penal Code 597t]. A dog can be tied to a running line, pulley or trolley system with no restriction on the time frame as long as the dog is not secured by a choke collar or pinch collar. The dog must still be able to access food, water and shelter as well as be able to avoid areas of feces and  urination [California Penal Code 597.1]. Violations should be reported by calling Culver City Animal Services at 310-837-1221.

Here are some suggestions on how you can keep your dog confined without violating this law:

  • Put fencing up that your dog cannot get under or over.
  • Keep your dog confined to a kennel or garage.
  • Use a trolley system, pulley or running line. (See sample picture below)
  • Do not tether the dog to the trolley system by means of a choke chain or pinch collar. Instead use a sturdy leather, canvas or nylon collar or harness.
  • Remember when using a trolley system not to place it too close to a fence that the dog can jump over and get hung on.
  • Keep water and shelter available at all times.
  • Keep the dogs running area free of items that it can become entangled in.
  

A person may do any of the following in accordance with Section 597t of the Penal Code:

  • Attach a dog to a running line, pulley, or trolley system. A dog shall not be tethered to the running line, pulley, or trolley system by means of a choke collar or pinch collar. (See sample picture below)
  • Tether, fasten, chain, tie, or otherwise restrain a dog pursuant to the requirements of a camping or recreational area.
  • Tether, fasten, chain, or tie a dog no longer than is necessary for the person to complete a temporary task that requires the dog to be restrained for a reasonable period.
  • Tether, fasten, chain, or tie a dog while engaged in, or actively training for, an activity that is conducted pursuant to a valid license issued by the State of California if the activity for which the license is issued is associated with the use or presence of a dog. Nothing in this paragraph shall be construed to prohibit a person from restraining a dog while participating in activities or using accommodations that are reasonably associated with the licensed activity.

TrolleyTethering

 

 

  TrolleySystem    Trolley-CloseUp    ClampNutAnchor

Is there anywhere I can take my dog off-leash in Culver City?

Besides within the owner's fenced property, the only place to take your dog off-leash in Culver City is "The Boneyard," an enclosed off-leash dog park located off Jefferson Boulevard with the cross street of Duquesne Avenue at the far corner of Culver City Park. "The Boneyard" is a little over 1 acre in size, with both a small and a large dog park area, benches, trees, temporary shade and weather structures, water fountains and utilizes decomposed granite as ground cover. Dogs are not allowed within the limits of any of the other Culver City Parks, except "The Boneyard" [Culver City Municipal Code 9.10.055].

Can I take my dog to the parks in Culver City, even on leash?

Dogs are not allowed within the limits of any public park within the Culver City [Culver City Municipal Code 9.10.055], except for the following:

  1. Only on leash on designated dog paths which are marked with blue paw prints in the Culver West Alexander Park [Culver City Municipal Code 9.10.600]
  2. Only on leash on designated dog paths which are marked with blue paw prints in the Culver City Park [Culver City Municipal Code 9.10.600]
  3. Off-leash only in "The Boneyard" which is the only enclosed off-leash Culver City dog park [Culver City Municipal Code 9.10.400]

"The Boneyard" is located off Jefferson Boulevard with the cross street of Duquesne Avenue at the far corner of the Culver City Park designated as the Culver City Dog Park (The "Dog Park"). Dogs are allowed within the limits of any public park within the City only if the dog owner has obtained a special permit from the City Council to conduct an entertainment or exhibition in which an animal is a participant [Culver City Municipal Code 9.10.055].

Where is the Culver City dog park?

The Culver City dog park is located off Jefferson Boulevard with the cross street of Duquesne Avenue at the far corner of Culver City Park. Dogs are not allowed within the limits of any of the other Culver City Parks, except "The Boneyard" [Culver City Municipal Code 9.10.055].

 

DogPark

What are the rules for the Culver City dog park?

Per [Culver City Municipal Code 9.10.400]:

1. The person who has charge, care, custody or control of any dog:

  1. Must ensure the dog is currently licensed, vaccinated and over the age of four (4) months, and provide proof of licensing upon request by any City official
  2. Must not allow more than three (3) dogs to be in his or her charge, care, custody or control while in the Dog Park
  3. Must use the appropriate areas of the Dog Park designated for "Small/Timid" or "Large" dogs
  4. Is required to pick-up and dispose of the dog's feces in trash receptacles both in and out of the Dog Park
  5. Must remain with the dog at all times while using the Dog Park, and is solely liable for any and all injuries and/or damage caused by the dog
  6. Shall not permit a dog with a known communicable disease in the Dog Park at any time
  7. Shall not permit a female dog in heat in the Dog Park
  8. Shall not permit an aggressive dog in the Dog Park
  9. Must have the dog restrained by a substantial chain or leash not exceeding six (6) feet in length at all times, except while inside the fenced areas of the Dog Park
  10. Must remove any pronged or spiked collar or choke collar from the dog prior to entry

2. Children twelve (12) years of age and under are not permitted in the Dog Park, unless accompanied and supervised by an adult at all times.

3. No person shall bring a stroller, carriage, baby carrier, bicycle, skateboard, scooter, children's toy, food, dog toy, dog treat or dog food in the Dog Park.

4. No person shall bring any animal, other than a dog, into the Dog Park.

5.

  1. No person shall conduct any activity at the Dog Park which may be an immediate danger to the public's health, safety and welfare.
  2. Such activity must cease immediately when asked to do so by a City official

6.

  1. Smoking is prohibited in the Dog Park
  2. The inhaling, exhaling, burning or carrying of any lighted pipe, cigar, cigarette, weed, plant or other combustible substance in any manner or any form is prohibited.

7. No person shall enter or use the Dog Park when it is closed.

8. No person shall operate or conduct a business within the Dog Park, unless permitted by the City.

9. The use of the Dog Park in the City by an owner of a dog or by a person having charge, care, custody or control of a dog shall constitute an agreement, by said owner or person having charge, care, custody or control of a dog, to protect, indemnify, defend and hold harmless the City from any claim of injury or damage arising from or in connection with the use of the Dog Park, including but not limited to, injuries arising from dog bites.

10.

  1. A person entering, using or visiting the Dog Park expressly assumes the risk of any injury or damage which may arise from or in connection with such entrance, visit or use of the Dog Park, including but not limited to, injuries resulting from dog bites.
  2. The City shall not be liable for injuries or damages arising from or in connection with the use of the Dog Park, including but not limited to, injuries resulting from dog bites, by anowner of a dog or by a person having charge, care, custody or control of a dog.

I am on my own front yard, but it is unfenced. Can I have my dog off-leash?

Even on your own property, unless the premises or front yard is fenced, your dog is not allowed to be off leash [Culver City Municipal Code 9.01.330]. A dog can be loose on the owner's property ONLY if within a fenced enclosure. It is illegal to open the door for the dog to go to the "bathroom" and wander about the neighborhood. It is also illegal to open the door of your automobile and have the dog run off-leash and unrestrained in an unfenced yard or driveway to the house. Violations are subject to citations with fines up to $500.

What does "under control" mean for a service animal?

The ADA requires that service animals be under the control of the handler at all times. In most instances, the handler will be the individual with a disability or a third party who accompanies the individual with a disability. In the school (K-12) context and in similar settings, the school or similar entity may need to provide some assistance to enable a particular student to handle his or her service animal. The service animal must be harnessed, leashed, or tethered while in public places unless these devices interfere with the service animal's work or the person's disability prevents use of these devices. In that case, the person must use voice, signal, or other effective means to maintain control of the animal. For example, a person who uses a wheelchair may use a long, retractable leash to allow her service animal to pick up or retrieve items. She may not allow the dog to wander away from her and must maintain control of the dog, even if it is retrieving an item at a distance from her. A returning veteran who has PTSD and has great difficulty entering unfamiliar spaces may have a dog that is trained to enter a space, check to see that no threats are there, and come back and signal that it is safe to enter. The dog must be off leash to do its job, but may be leashed at other times. Under control also means that a service animal should not be allowed to bark repeatedly in a lecture hall, theater, library, or other quiet place. However, if a dog barks just once, or barks because someone has provoked it, this would not mean that the dog is out of control.

For a flyer on more information from the ADA: https://www.culvercitypd.org/Home/ShowDocument?id=12958

 

Do service animals have to be on a leash?

The ADA requires that service animals be under the control of the handler at all times. In most instances, the handler will be the individual with a disability or a third party who accompanies the individual with a disability. In the school (K-12) context and in similar settings, the school or similar entity may need to provide some assistance to enable a particular student to handle his or her service animal. The service animal must be harnessed, leashed, or tethered while in public places unless these devices interfere with the service animal's work or the person's disability prevents use of these devices. In that case, the person must use voice, signal, or other effective means to maintain control of the animal. For example, a person who uses a wheelchair may use a long, retractable leash to allow her service animal to pick up or retrieve items. She may not allow the dog to wander away from her and must maintain control of the dog, even if it is retrieving an item at a distance from her. Or, a returning veteran who has PTSD and has great difficulty entering unfamiliar spaces may have a dog that is trained to enter a space, check to see that no threats are there, and come back and signal that it is safe to enter. The dog must be off leash to do its job, but may be leashed at other times.

For a flyer on more information from the ADA: https://www.culvercitypd.org/Home/ShowDocument?id=12958

What are the rules on animals running loose?

No dog is permitted to be loose on private or public premises unless such premises are fenced in such a manner as to adequately confine said dog. There are several ordinances that apply:

The "Dog at Large" ordinance states that no dog is permitted to roam free. If the dog leaves the owner's or custodian's enclosed property, the dog must be restrained by a substantial chain or leash not exceeding six feet in length, in the control of a competent person and wearing a Culver City pet license [Culver City Municipal Code 9.01.335].

A dog can be loose on the owner's property ONLY if within a fenced enclosure. It is illegal to open the door for the dog to go to the "bathroom" and wander about the neighborhood. It is also illegal to open the door of your automobile and have the dog run off-leash and unrestrained in an unfenced yard or driveway to the house [Culver City Municipal Code 9.01.330].

The "leash law" applies only to dogs. This ordinance states that when a dog is being walked on any highway, street, lane, alley, sidewalk, median, parkway, court, public place, or public right-of-way, it has to be on a leash or lead at all times. Dogs being walked on a leash must also be wearing a Culver City pet license [Culver City Municipal Code 9.01.320].

Violations are subject to citations with fines up to $500.

I walk my dog off-leash, but I am carrying my leash. Isn't that legal?

No, just carrying your leash does not meet the "Leash Law" requirement. No dog is permitted to be loose on private or public premises unless such premises are fenced in such a manner as to adequately confine said dog. If your dog leaves your enclosed property, your dog must be restrained by a substantial chain or leash not exceeding six feet in length, in the control of a competent person and wearing a Culver City pet license [Culver City Municipal Code 9.01.335]. A dog can be loose on the owner's property ONLY if within a fenced enclosure. Therefore, it is illegal to walk your dog off-leash, even if you are carrying the leash. Violations are subject to citations with fines up to $500.

My neighbor's dog keeps getting out. What do I do?

You can submit a complaint via telephone at 310-253-6143, via e-mail at animal.services@culvercity.org, or via fax at 310-253-6217 (Please ensure to attention: Culver City Animal Services). If the Culver City Animal Services Officer observes a violation at the time of the visit, appropriate action will be taken. To assist in the investigation, residents can provide supportive evidence, photographs, video recordings, and documentation regarding a complaint to:

Culver City Animal Services
Culver City Police Department
4040 Duquesne Avenue
Culver City, California 90232

Residents can also e-mail the information or complaint to:

animal.services@culvercity.org

Can I take my dog to the parks in Culver City, even on leash?

Dogs are not allowed within the limits of any public park within the Culver City [Culver City Municipal Code 9.10.055], except for the following:

  1. Only on leash on designated dog paths which are marked with blue paw prints in the Culver West Alexander Park [Culver City Municipal Code 9.10.600]
  2. Only on leash on designated dog paths which are marked with blue paw prints in the Culver City Park [Culver City Municipal Code 9.10.600]
  3. Off-leash only in "The Boneyard" which is the only enclosed off-leash Culver City dog park [Culver City Municipal Code 9.10.400]

"The Boneyard" is located off Jefferson Boulevard with the cross street of Duquesne Avenue at the far corner of the Culver City Park designated as the Culver City Dog Park (The "Dog Park"). Dogs are allowed within the limits of any public park within the City only if the dog owner has obtained a special permit from the City Council to conduct an entertainment or exhibition in which an animal is a participant [Culver City Municipal Code 9.10.055].

What does "under control" mean for a service animal?

The ADA requires that service animals be under the control of the handler at all times. In most instances, the handler will be the individual with a disability or a third party who accompanies the individual with a disability. In the school (K-12) context and in similar settings, the school or similar entity may need to provide some assistance to enable a particular student to handle his or her service animal. The service animal must be harnessed, leashed, or tethered while in public places unless these devices interfere with the service animal's work or the person's disability prevents use of these devices. In that case, the person must use voice, signal, or other effective means to maintain control of the animal. For example, a person who uses a wheelchair may use a long, retractable leash to allow her service animal to pick up or retrieve items. She may not allow the dog to wander away from her and must maintain control of the dog, even if it is retrieving an item at a distance from her. A returning veteran who has PTSD and has great difficulty entering unfamiliar spaces may have a dog that is trained to enter a space, check to see that no threats are there, and come back and signal that it is safe to enter. The dog must be off leash to do its job, but may be leashed at other times. Under control also means that a service animal should not be allowed to bark repeatedly in a lecture hall, theater, library, or other quiet place. However, if a dog barks just once, or barks because someone has provoked it, this would not mean that the dog is out of control.

For a flyer on more information from the ADA: https://www.culvercitypd.org/Home/ShowDocument?id=12958

 

Do service animals have to be on a leash?

The ADA requires that service animals be under the control of the handler at all times. In most instances, the handler will be the individual with a disability or a third party who accompanies the individual with a disability. In the school (K-12) context and in similar settings, the school or similar entity may need to provide some assistance to enable a particular student to handle his or her service animal. The service animal must be harnessed, leashed, or tethered while in public places unless these devices interfere with the service animal's work or the person's disability prevents use of these devices. In that case, the person must use voice, signal, or other effective means to maintain control of the animal. For example, a person who uses a wheelchair may use a long, retractable leash to allow her service animal to pick up or retrieve items. She may not allow the dog to wander away from her and must maintain control of the dog, even if it is retrieving an item at a distance from her. Or, a returning veteran who has PTSD and has great difficulty entering unfamiliar spaces may have a dog that is trained to enter a space, check to see that no threats are there, and come back and signal that it is safe to enter. The dog must be off leash to do its job, but may be leashed at other times.

For a flyer on more information from the ADA: https://www.culvercitypd.org/Home/ShowDocument?id=12958

Is there a leash law in Culver City?

There is a leash law in Culver City, but it only applies to dogs. No dog is permitted to be loose on private or public premises unless such premises are fenced in such a manner as to adequately confine said dog. Violations are subject to citations with fines up to $500.

There are several ordinances that apply:

The "Dog at Large" ordinance states that no dog is permitted to roam free. If the dog leaves the owner's or custodian's enclosed property, the dog must be restrained by a substantial chain or leash not exceeding six feet in length, in the control of a competent person and wearing a Culver City pet license [Culver City Municipal Code 9.01.335].

A dog can be loose on the owner's property ONLY if within a fenced enclosure. It is illegal to open the door for the dog to go to the "bathroom" and wander about the neighborhood. It is also illegal to open the door of your automobile and have the dog run off-leash and unrestrained in an unfenced yard or driveway to the house [Culver City Municipal Code 9.01.330].

The "leash law" applies only to dogs. This ordinance states that when a dog is being walked on any highway, street, lane, alley, sidewalk, median, parkway, court, public place, or public right-of-way, it has to be on a leash or lead at all times. Dogs being walked on a leash must also be wearing a Culver City pet license [Culver City Municipal Code 9.01.320].

What are the rules on animals running loose?

No dog is permitted to be loose on private or public premises unless such premises are fenced in such a manner as to adequately confine said dog. There are several ordinances that apply:

The "Dog at Large" ordinance states that no dog is permitted to roam free. If the dog leaves the owner's or custodian's enclosed property, the dog must be restrained by a substantial chain or leash not exceeding six feet in length, in the control of a competent person and wearing a Culver City pet license [Culver City Municipal Code 9.01.335].

A dog can be loose on the owner's property ONLY if within a fenced enclosure. It is illegal to open the door for the dog to go to the "bathroom" and wander about the neighborhood. It is also illegal to open the door of your automobile and have the dog run off-leash and unrestrained in an unfenced yard or driveway to the house [Culver City Municipal Code 9.01.330].

The "leash law" applies only to dogs. This ordinance states that when a dog is being walked on any highway, street, lane, alley, sidewalk, median, parkway, court, public place, or public right-of-way, it has to be on a leash or lead at all times. Dogs being walked on a leash must also be wearing a Culver City pet license [Culver City Municipal Code 9.01.320].

Violations are subject to citations with fines up to $500.

I walk my dog off-leash, but I am carrying my leash. Isn't that legal?

No, just carrying your leash does not meet the "Leash Law" requirement. No dog is permitted to be loose on private or public premises unless such premises are fenced in such a manner as to adequately confine said dog. If your dog leaves your enclosed property, your dog must be restrained by a substantial chain or leash not exceeding six feet in length, in the control of a competent person and wearing a Culver City pet license [Culver City Municipal Code 9.01.335]. A dog can be loose on the owner's property ONLY if within a fenced enclosure. Therefore, it is illegal to walk your dog off-leash, even if you are carrying the leash. Violations are subject to citations with fines up to $500.

Can I take my dog to the parks in Culver City, even on leash?

Dogs are not allowed within the limits of any public park within the Culver City [Culver City Municipal Code 9.10.055], except for the following:

  1. Only on leash on designated dog paths which are marked with blue paw prints in the Culver West Alexander Park [Culver City Municipal Code 9.10.600]
  2. Only on leash on designated dog paths which are marked with blue paw prints in the Culver City Park [Culver City Municipal Code 9.10.600]
  3. Off-leash only in "The Boneyard" which is the only enclosed off-leash Culver City dog park [Culver City Municipal Code 9.10.400]

"The Boneyard" is located off Jefferson Boulevard with the cross street of Duquesne Avenue at the far corner of the Culver City Park designated as the Culver City Dog Park (The "Dog Park"). Dogs are allowed within the limits of any public park within the City only if the dog owner has obtained a special permit from the City Council to conduct an entertainment or exhibition in which an animal is a participant [Culver City Municipal Code 9.10.055].

My dog just runs off-leash from my house to my car. Does my dog really have to be on leash?

Yes, your dog must be leashed even on your own property, unless the premises or front yard is fenced [Culver City Municipal Code 9.01.330]. A dog can be loose on the owner's property ONLY if within a fenced enclosure. It is illegal to open the door for the dog to go to the "bathroom" and wander about the neighborhood. It is also illegal to open the door of your automobile and have the dog run off-leash and unrestrained in an unfenced yard or driveway to the house. Violations are subject to citations with fines up to $500.

What are the Culver City Municipal Codes regarding animals?

You can access Title 9 of the municipal codes for Culver City by going to the link below:

http://www.amlegal.com/codes/client/culver-city_ca/

For a brochure on the Culver City Municipal Codes regarding the most common violations regarding animals:

https://www.culvercity.org/home/showdocument?id=12459

What gives the Animal Services Officer law enforcement powers while on duty?

California Penal Code 830.9
  • Animal control officers are not peace officers but may exercise the powers of arrest of a peace officer as specified in Section 836 and the power to serve warrants as specified in Sections 1523 and 1530 during the course and within the scope of their employment, if those officers successfully complete a course in the exercise of those powers pursuant to Section 832.

California Penal Code 832

  • Every person described in this chapter as a peace officer shall satisfactorily complete an introductory training course prescribed by the Commission on Peace Officer Standards and Training. On or after July 1, 1989, satisfactory completion of the course shall be demonstrated by passage of an appropriate examination developed or approved by the commission.

 

Can a Culver City Animal Services Officer enter my yard to remove an animal?

Yes. The Culver City Animal Services Officer is authorized to enter private property under certain conditions, especially under exigent circumstances [California Penal Code 597]. An Animal Services Officer may enter the property to investigate cruelty to animal violations and to investigate any violation observed in progress. This means if an Animal Services Officer is chasing a stray animal and the animal runs into the owner's yard, the Animal Services Officer may enter the property and remove the animal if the owner or custodian is not there to properly confine the animal. The Culver City Animal Services Officer is also authorized to enter private property to impound a biting dog and cat for rabies quarantine [California Health and Safety Code 121615 and 121625].

Is declawing a cat legal in Culver City?

No. Per Culver City Municipal Code 9.01.600, no person, licensed medical professional or otherwise, shall perform or cause to be performed an onychectomy (declawing) or flexor tendonectomy procedure by any means on any animal within the City, except when necessary for a therapeutic purpose.

Therapeutic purpose means the necessity to address the medical condition of the animal, such as an existing or recurring illness, infection, disease, injury or abnormal condition in the claw that compromises the animal's health. Therapeutic purpose does not include cosmetic or aesthetic reasons or reasons of convenience in keeping or handling the animal.

A violation of this ordinance is a misdemeanor.

 

What is an appeal hearing?

 An appeal hearing is a formal hearing conducted by a Hearing Officer to accept testimony, under oath, from all interested parties when a determination of violation validity has been appealed. If you are issued an Administrative Citation and you believe that it was issued in error, you have the right to contest an Administrative Citation and request a hearing before a Hearing Officer by completing and filing a Request for Hearing within 15 days from the date of the issuance of the Administrative Citation. However, there are acceptable grounds for an appeal. Unacceptable grounds of appeal of a citation will result in a determination that the citation is upheld and the forfeiture of your deposit.

The administrative appeal process includes three levels of appeal:

  1. Administrative Review
  2. Administrative Hearing
  3. Appeal through the Superior Court

For the Administrative Review and Hearing, there are acceptable grounds for an appeal. Unacceptable grounds of appeal of a citation will result in a determination that the citation is upheld and the forfeiture of your deposit.

The following are acceptable grounds of appeal of a citation:

  • No violation of the Culver City animal regulation(s) was committed. (Example: You were cited for your dog off-leash, but your dog was on leash.)
  • You were not the individual indicated on the Administration Citation who committed the violation. (Example: You were cited for your dog running at large, but you don't own any dogs.)

The following are not acceptable grounds for appeal of a citation:

  • Lack of knowledge of the Culver City animal regulations (Example: You were cited for your dog off-leash on your unfenced front lawn, but you state that you did not know that you weren't allowed to have your dog off-leash if your own property is not fenced in.)
  • Disapproval with the Culver City animal regulations (Example: You were cited for your dog in Tellefson Park, but you don't think that dogs should not be allowed in Culver City parks.)

For questions regarding this citation, please call 310-253-5940.

What are the liabilities concerning property damage or personal injury and my pet?

Any property damage or personal injury caused by an animal is the responsibility of the owner of the animal causing the damage or injury [California Civil Code 3342]. There is an ordinance relating to property damage or injury to another animal. Your options for recovery of personal injury expenses are civil issues and should be pursued through home owner's or health insurance coverage, small claims court, or a personal attorney.

Culver City requires all dogs over the age of 4 months to be rabies vaccinated. Does this apply to my service animal?

Yes.  Individuals who have service animals are not exempt from local animal control or public health requirements.

For a flyer on more information from the ADA: https://www.culvercitypd.org/Home/ShowDocument?id=12958

 

Culver City requires all dogs over the age of 4 months to be licensed. Does this apply to my service animal?

Yes.  Service animals are subject to local dog licensing and registration requirements.

For a flyer on more information from the ADA: https://www.culvercitypd.org/Home/ShowDocument?id=12958

You may be exempt from paying the dog license fee if:

  • You are a resident of Culver City who meets the criterion of Disability, as established by the Social Security Administration’s Supplemental Security income (SSI) Program for the Aged, Blind,
    and Disabled (Title SVI of the Social Security Act as amended), without regard to your age.

To apply:

1. Please fill out the Pet License Fee Exemption Application: https://www.culvercity.org/Home/ShowDocument?id=12457

2. Include proof of SSI disability. This paperwork will be returned and will not be required again.

3. Include a current rabies certificate for each pet to be license, or proof from your veterinarian of exemption (if applicable).

4. Include each pet's microchip number, or proof from your veterinarian of exemption (if applicable).

  

 

Culver City requires all dogs over the age of 4 months to be spayed/neutered (altered). Does this apply to my service animal?

No.  Service animals are subject to local dog licensing and registration requirements, but there are exemptions to this spay/neuter ordinance[Los Angeles County Code 10.20.350]:

  1. Dogs which are unable to be spayed or neutered without a high likelihood of suffering serious bodily harm or death due to age or infirmity (Written confirmation from a licensed veterinarian is required to qualify for this exception.)
  2. Dogs used by law enforcement agencies for law enforcement purposes
  3. Service or assistance dogs that assist disabled persons
  4. Competition dogs (A Competition Dog is a dog which is used to show, to compete or to breed, which is of a breed recognized by and registered with the American Kennel Club (AKC), United Kennel Club (UKC), American Dog Breeders Association (ADBA) or other approved breed registries. The dog or owner must also meet ONE of the following requirements:
  • The dog has competed in at least one dog show or sporting competition sanctioned by a national registry or approved by the department within the last 365 days
  • The dog has earned a conformation, obedience, agility, carting, herding, protection, rally, sporting, working or other title from a purebred dog registry referenced above or  other registry or dog sport association approved by the department
  • The owner or custodian of the dog is a member of a department approved purebred dog breed clubs, which maintains and enforces a code of ethics for dog breeding that includes restrictions from breeding dogs with genetic defects and life threatening health problems that commonly threaten the breed.

If your dog meets one of these exemptions, please complete the following application: https://www.culvercity.org/Home/ShowDocument?id=12457

My dog is old, sick, or has health issues. Do I still have to spay or neuter (alter), microchip, and rabies vaccinate my dog in Culver City?

Although dogs in Culver City are required to be spayed or neutered (altered) [Los Angeles County Code 10.20.350], microchipped [Los Angeles County Code 10.20.185], and rabies vaccinated [Los Angeles  County Code 10.28.190], there are exemptions, especially for dogs with health issues. Dogs that are unable to be spayed, neutered, microchipped and rabies vaccinated without a high likelihood of suffering serious bodily harm or death due to age or infirmity will require written confirmation from a licensed veterinarian to qualify for this exception.

If your dog meets this exemption, please complete the following application for licensing: https://www.culvercity.org/Home/ShowDocument?id=12457

 

Where can I get a Culver City Animal License?

You can complete a Culver City pet license via internet at:

https://secure.petdata.com/petlicense/muni/cul/

You can also request a Culver City license application at:

Culver City Animal Services
Culver City Police Department
4040 Duquesne Avenue
Culver City, California 90232

Residents can also e-mail the information or complaint to:

animal.services@culvercity.org

For further information on pet licensing and Culver City requirements, you may also contact 1-888-615-4350 for further information.

For the Culver City license application:

https://www.culvercity.org/home/showdocument?id=12458

For a flyer with instructions for how to license your animal:

https://www.culvercity.org/Home/ShowDocument?id=12956

 

 

What do I need to license my dog in Culver City?

To license your dog, all dogs over 4 months of age must be spayed or neutered (altered) [Los Angeles County Code 10.20.350], microchipped [Los Angeles County Code 10.20.185], and rabies vaccinated [Los Angeles County Code 10.28.190]. Dogs that are unable to be spayed, neutered, microchipped and rabies vaccinated without a high likelihood of suffering serious bodily harm or death due to age or infirmity must have written confirmation from a licensed veterinarian to qualify for this exception. Even if you dog qualifies for any or all of the exemptions to the requirements of the license ordinance, your dog still must be licensed.

Required Paperwork for Licensing:

  1. A current rabies vaccination certificate is required. Please check your certificate for correct address and pet information.
  2. Proof of spay/neuter, such as a signed statement from a veterinarian or an invoice for services is required if you are applying for the lower spayed/neutered license fee.
  3. The dog’s microchip number is required. If your dog is microchipped, but you cannot locate the documentation with the microchip number, a veterinarian or the Culver City Animal Services
    Officer can scan your dog and provide you the microchip number.

Required Documentation for an Unaltered Dog:
(If your dog does not qualify for the spay/neuter exemptions listed below, your dog must be spayed/neutered (altered) [Los Angeles County Code 10.20.350])

  1. Health Exemption: Please submit written confirmation from a licensed veterinarian that the dog is unable to be spayed or neutered without a high likelihood of serious bodily harm or death due to age or infirmity.
  2. Law Enforcement Dog Exemption: Please submit the name of the agency for which the dog is actively being used.
  3. Service Dog Exemption: Please submit documentation of either the training agency or a registry for the service animal.
  4. Competition Dog Exemption: A Competition Dog is a dog which is used to show, to compete or to breed, which is of a breed recognized by and registered with the American Kennel Club (AKC), United Kennel Club (UKC), American Dog Breeders Association (ADBA) or other approved breed registries. The dog or owner must also meet ONE of the following requirements:

a. The dog has competed in at least one dog show or sporting competition sanctioned by a national registry or approved by the department within the last 365 days; or
b. The dog has earned a conformation, obedience, agility, carting, herding, protection, rally, sporting, working or other title from a purebred dog registry referenced above or other
registry or dog sport association approved by the department; or
c. The owner or custodian of the dog is a member of a department approved purebred dog breed clubs, which maintains and enforces a code of ethics for dog breeding that includes restrictions from breeding dogs with genetic defects and life threatening health problems that commonly threaten the breed.

You can complete a Culver City pet license via internet at: https://secure.petdata.com/petlicense/muni/cul/

For the Culver City license application: https://www.culvercity.org/home/showdocument?id=12458

For the Culver City license fee exemption application for low-income reduced rate or senior citizen discounted rate: https://www.culvercity.org/Home/ShowDocument?id=12457

You can also request a Culver City license application at:

Culver City Animal Services
Culver City Police Department
4040 Duquesne Avenue
Culver City, California 90232

Residents can also e-mail the information or complaint to:animal.services@culvercity.org

For a flyer with instructions for how to license your animal: https://www.culvercity.org/Home/ShowDocument?id=12956

 

Where can I get a Culver City Animal Permit?

No person shall keep or permit to be kept on any or in any lot, building, structure or premises more than 3 dogs over the age of 4 months or more than 3 cats over the age of 4 months without first having applied for and received an Animal Permit as provided herein [Culver City Municipal Code 9.01.020].

You may be approved for more than 3 adult dogs or 3 adults cats only if there are no prior complaints on your animals, if you meet all the requirements for the Animal Permit, and if the Culver City Permit Application is officially approved [Culver City Municipal Code 9.01.020].

Application for permit

  • All applications for permits to keep animals, fowl or reptiles shall be filed with the City Clerk, shall be accompanied by a fee of $50.00 and shall state the number and kind of animals, fowl or reptiles as well as such other information required by the City Clerk. Signatures of at least 1 adult resident of each dwelling or apartment unit within a radius of 200 feet, indicating approval or disapproval, shall be appended to such applications. Upon receipt of application, a copy thereof shall be referred to the Culver City Animal Services for investigation and report.
  • Upon receipt of said reports, the City Clerk shall cause notices to be posted within a radius of 200 feet from the address wherein said animals, fowl or reptiles are proposed to be kept, and not more than 50 feet apart. Permit will be granted providing no written objections are filed within ten days and approval is received from the City's health agency and Police Department.

You can obtain the Culver City Animal Permit online: https://www.culvercity.org/Home/ShowDocument?id=12940

You can complete a Culver City Animal Permit application in person at:

City of Culver City - City Hall
9770 Culver Boulevard
Culver City, California

* City Hall hours are from 7:30 am to 5:30 pm Monday through Friday.
* City Hall is closed on holidays, weekends, and alternating Fridays.

You can request a Culver City Animal Permit application at:

Culver City Animal Services
Culver City Police Department
4040 Duquesne Avenue
Culver City, California 90232

Residents can also e-mail the information or complaint to:

animal.services@culvercity.org

 

Does my pet have to be spayed or neutered (altered) in Culver City?

Dogs in Culver City are required to be spayed or neutered (altered) [Los Angeles County Code 10.20.350]. Spaying and neutering presents many health benefits for dogs. Certain types of cancers in dogs are eliminated by spaying and neutering. Sterilized dogs are less likely to roam and therefore less likely to be lost, hit by a car, injured in a fight, or abused. By spaying or neutering your dog, you are helping solve the problem of pet overpopulation and protecting your dog from potential harm.

Since some dogs cannot be spayed or neutered for certain reasons, this ordinance has exemptions for these cases:

  1. Dogs which are unable to be spayed or neutered without a high likelihood of suffering serious bodily harm or death due to age or infirmity (Written confirmation from a licensed veterinarian is required to qualify for this exception.)
  2. Dogs used by law enforcement agencies for law enforcement purposes
  3. Service or assistance dogs that assist disabled persons
  4. Competition dogs (A Competition Dog is a dog which is used to show, to compete or to breed, which is of a breed recognized by and registered with the American Kennel Club (AKC), United Kennel Club (UKC), American Dog Breeders Association (ADBA) or other approved breed registries. The dog or owner must also meet ONE of the following requirements:
  • The dog has competed in at least one dog show or sporting competition sanctioned by a national registry or approved by the department within the last 365 days
  • The dog has earned a conformation, obedience, agility, carting, herding, protection, rally, sporting, working or other title from a purebred dog registry referenced above or  other registry or dog sport association approved by the department
  • The owner or custodian of the dog is a member of a department approved purebred dog breed clubs, which maintains and enforces a code of ethics for dog breeding that includes restrictions from breeding dogs with genetic defects and life threatening health problems that commonly threaten the breed.

If your dog meets one of these exemptions, please complete the following application: https://www.culvercity.org/Home/ShowDocument?id=12457

 

Are discounted pet licenses available for Culver City seniors/low-income/disabled pet owners?

Yes, you may be exempt from paying the dog license fee if:

1. You are a resident of Culver City.

2. You are 60 years of age or older;

3. Your Total Adjusted Gross Income, as used for purposes of the California Personal Income Tax Law, was no more than $18,200 for the last calendar year;

AND

The combined Adjusted Gross Income of all members of the household in which you reside was more no more than $21,500;

OR

4. You are a resident of Culver City who meets the criterion of Disability, as established by the Social Security Administration’s Supplemental Security income (SSI) Program for the Aged, Blind,
and Disabled (Title SVI of the Social Security Act as amended), without regard to your age.

To apply:

1. Please fill out the Pet License Fee Exemption Application: https://www.culvercity.org/Home/ShowDocument?id=12457

2. Include proof of income and age (60 years of age and older) or proof of SSI disability. This paperwork will be returned and will not be required again.

3. Include a current rabies certificate for each pet to be license, or proof from your veterinarian of exemption (if applicable).

4. Include a proof of spay/neuter status for each pet, or proof from your veterinarian of exemption (if applicable).

5. Include each pet's microchip number, or proof from your veterinarian of exemption (if applicable).

Low Income Pet Owners

 

You can complete a Culver City pet license via internet at:

https://secure.petdata.com/petlicense/muni/cul/

For further information on pet licensing and Culver City requirements, you may also contact 1-888-615-4350 for further information.

For the Culver City license application:

https://www.culvercity.org/home/showdocument?id=12458

 

Does my pet have to be microchipped in Culver City?

All dogs over the age of 4 months in Culver City are required to be implanted with an identifying microchip [Los Angeles County Code 10.20.185]. The owner or custodian is required to provide the microchip number to the Culver City Animal Services and the national registry applicable to the implanted microchip, a change of ownership of the dog, or a change of address or telephone number. Microchipping of cats in Culver City is voluntary, but microchipping will help your cat get home in the event your cat gets brought to the shelter. There are exemptions to the microchipping requirement, especially for dogs with health issue. Dogs that are unable to be spayed, neutered, microchipped and rabies vaccinated without a high likelihood of suffering serious bodily harm or death due to age or infirmity will require written confirmation from a licensed veterinarian to qualify for this exception.

If your dog meets this exemption:

https://www.culvercity.org/home/showdocument?id=12453

 

Does my dog have to be rabies vaccinated in Culver City, even if my dog never leaves the home?

All dogs over the age of 4 months in Culver City are required to be currently rabies vaccinated [Los Angeles County Code 10.28.190]. The owner or custodian is required to provide the microchip number to the Culver City Animal Services and the national registry applicable to the implanted chip, a change of ownership of the dog, or a change of address or telephone number. Rabies vaccination of cats in Culver City is voluntary. However, if your cat is involved in a bite incident with a human, your cat may be quarantined at home only if your cat is currently rabies vaccinated. There are exemptions to the rabies vaccination requirement, especially for dogs with health issues. Dogs that are unable to be spayed, neutered, microchipped and rabies vaccinated without a high likelihood of suffering serious bodily harm or death due to age or infirmity will require written confirmation from a licensed veterinarian to qualify for this exception.

If your dog meets this exemption:

https://www.culvercity.org/home/showdocument?id=12453

 

When do dogs need licenses in Culver City?

Dogs over 4 months of age must be licensed every year in Culver City [Culver City Municipal Code 9.01.300]. Please note that Los Angeles City dog licenses and Los Angeles County dog licenses are not recognized in Culver City [Culver City Municipal Code 9.01.310]. The City of Culver City requires that all dogs have current Culver City licenses, have current rabies vaccinations, have been spayed/neutered and have been microchipped. Even if your dog never leaves the house, your dog must still have a dog license and must be spayed/neutered (altered), rabies vaccinated and microchipped. At some point and time your dog may accidentally get out, there may be a disaster and you get separated from your dog, or a stray or sick animal can enter your property. Having your dog microchipped and a license on your dog helps Culver City Animal Services get your dog back to you. Violations are subject to citations with fines up to $500.

You can complete a Culver City pet license via internet at:

https://secure.petdata.com/petlicense/muni/cul/

For further information on pet licensing and Culver City requirements, you may also contact 1-888-615-4350 for further information.

For the Culver City license application:

https://www.culvercity.org/home/showdocument?id=12458

Does my cat have to be rabies vaccinated in Culver City?

Rabies vaccination of cats in Culver City is voluntary, but in case your cat is involved in a bite incident with a human, your cat can be quarantined at home only if your cat is currently rabies vaccinated.

You can complete a Culver City pet license via internet at:

https://secure.petdata.com/petlicense/muni/cul/

For further information on pet licensing and Culver City requirements, you may also contact 1-888-615-4350 for further information.

For the Culver City license application:

https://www.culvercity.org/home/showdocument?id=12458

Do cats need licenses in Culver City?

Licensing for cats in Culver City is voluntary. At some point and time your cat may accidentally get out, there may be a disaster and you get separated from your cat, or a stray or sick animal can enter your property. Having your cat microchipped and a license on your cat helps Culver City Animal Services get your cat back to you.

You can complete a Culver City pet license via internet at:

https://secure.petdata.com/petlicense/muni/cul/

For further information on pet licensing and Culver City requirements, you may also contact 1-888-615-4350 for further information.

For the Culver City license application:

https://www.culvercity.org/home/showdocument?id=12458

 

Can I have more than 3 dogs or 3 cats?

No person shall keep or permit to be kept on any or in any lot, building, structure or premises more than 3 dogs over the age of 4 months or more than 3 cats over the age of 4 months without first having applied for and received an Animal Permit as provided herein [Culver City Municipal Code 9.01.020].

You may be approved for more than 3 adult dogs or 3 adults cats only if there are no prior complaints on your animals, if you meet all the requirements for the Animal Permit, and if the Culver City Permit Application is officially approved [Culver City Municipal Code 9.01.020].

Application for permit

  • All applications for permits to keep animals, fowl or reptiles shall be filed with the City Clerk, shall be accompanied by a fee of $50.00 and shall state the number and kind of animals, fowl or reptiles as well as such other information required by the City Clerk. Signatures of at least 1 adult resident of each dwelling or apartment unit within a radius of 200 feet, indicating approval or disapproval, shall be appended to such applications. Upon receipt of application, a copy thereof shall be referred to the Culver City Animal Services for investigation and report.
  • Upon receipt of said reports, the City Clerk shall cause notices to be posted within a radius of 200 feet from the address wherein said animals, fowl or reptiles are proposed to be kept, and not more than 50 feet apart. Permit will be granted providing no written objections are filed within ten days and approval is received from the City's health agency and Police Department.

You can obtain the Culver City Animal Permit online: https://www.culvercity.org/Home/ShowDocument?id=12940

You can complete a Culver City Animal Permit application in person at:

City of Culver City - City Hall
9770 Culver Boulevard
Culver City, California

* City Hall hours are from 7:30 am to 5:30 pm Monday through Friday.
* City Hall is closed on holidays, weekends, and alternating Fridays.

You can request a Culver City Animal Permit application at:

Culver City Animal Services
Culver City Police Department
4040 Duquesne Avenue
Culver City, California 90232

Residents can also e-mail the information or complaint to:

animal.services@culvercity.org

 

My dog is licensed in Los Angeles County/Los Angeles City. Isn't my dog considered licensed in Culver City?

No, dogs over 4 months of age must be licensed every year in Culver City [Culver City Municipal Code 9.01.300]. Los Angeles City dog licenses and Los Angeles County dog licenses are not recognized in Culver City [Culver City Municipal Code 9.01.310]. The City of Culver City requires that all dogs have current Culver City licenses, have current rabies vaccinations, have been spayed/neutered and have been microchipped. Even if your dog never leaves the house, your dog must still have a dog license and must be spayed/neutered (altered), rabies vaccinated and microchipped. At some point and time your dog may accidentally get out, there may be a disaster and you get separated from your dog, or a stray or sick animal can enter your property. Having your dog microchipped and a license on your dog helps Culver City Animal Services get your dog back to you. Violations are subject to citations with fines up to $500.

You can complete a Culver City pet license via internet at: https://secure.petdata.com/petlicense/muni/cul/

For further information on pet licensing and Culver City requirements, you may also contact 1-888-615-4350 for further information.

For the Culver City license application: https://www.culvercity.org/home/showdocument?id=12458

Does my pet have to be licensed in Culver City, even if my pet never leaves the home?

Dogs over 4 months of age must be licensed every year in Culver City [Culver City Municipal Code 9.01.300]. Any person keeping or harboring any dog for 15 consecutive days shall be deemed to be the owner [Culver City Municipal Code 9.01.310]. Culver City licenses are valid for the period of only 12 months and you must renew annually [Los Angeles County Code 10.28.090]. Violations are subject to citations with fines up to $500. Licensing of cats are voluntary, but licensing will help your cat get home in the event your cat gets brought to the shelter. Please note that Los Angeles City dog licenses and Los Angeles County dog licenses are not recognized in Culver City [Culver City Municipal Code 9.01.310].

Besides Culver City Municipal Codes, California state law and county ordinances require that a dog license be purchased every year and be securely fastened to the dog’s collar [California Health and Safety Code 1920, California Food and Agriculture Code 30502, and Los Angeles County Code 10.20.190]. Even if your dog never leaves the house, your dog must still have a dog license. At some point and time your dog may accidentally get out, there may be a disaster and you get separated from your dog, or a stray or sick animal can enter your property. Having a license on your dog helps Culver City Animal Services get your dog back to you.

You can complete a Culver City pet license via internet at: https://secure.petdata.com/petlicense/muni/cul/

You can also request a Culver City license application at:

Culver City Animal Services
Culver City Police Department
4040 Duquesne Avenue
Culver City, California 90232

Residents can also e-mail the information or complaint to:

animal.services@culvercity.org

For further information on pet licensing and Culver City requirements, you may also contact 1-888-615-4350 for further information.

For the Culver City license application: https://www.culvercity.org/home/showdocument?id=12458

What is the difference between registering my dog and licensing my dog?

Registering your dog is optional and involves submitting an application to a breed registry to record and recognize your dog's lineage (sire/dam), breeding history and pure-bred pedigree status. Licensing your dog is mandatory and involves conforming to Culver City Municipal Codes [Culver City Municipal Code 9.01.300] that require current rabies vaccination confirmation, microchip confirmation, spay/neuter confirmation, and adherence to defined limitations of numbers of animals per household.

I registered my dog with a breed registry and received a tag for my dog's collar. Isn't my dog now?

No, the tags you may have received from the breed registry are rabies tags and/or microchip tags which do NOT meet the licensing requirements in Culver City. Licensing CAN ONLY be obtained through PetData at http://www.petdata.com/for-pet-owners/cul/ or via postal mail to:

Culver City Dog Licensing
c/o PetData
P.O. Box 141929
Irving, TX 75014 

You are still responsible for licensing any dog over the age of four months of age. Dogs over 4 months of age must be licensed every year in Culver City [Culver City Municipal Code 9.01.300]. Any person keeping or harboring any dog for 15 consecutive days shall be deemed to be the owner [Culver City Municipal Code 9.01.310]. Culver City licenses are valid for the period of only 12 months and you must renew annually [Los Angeles County Code 10.28.090]. Violations are subject to citations with fines up to $500.

You can complete a Culver City pet license via internet at: https://secure.petdata.com/petlicense/muni/cul/

For further information on pet licensing and Culver City requirements, you may also contact 1-888-615-4350 for further information.

For the Culver City license application: https://www.culvercity.org/home/showdocument?id=12458

I adopted my dog from a rescue/shelter and received a tag for my dog's collar. Isn't my dog now?

No, the tags you may have received from the rescue or shelter are rabies tags and/or microchip tags which do NOT meet the licensing requirements in Culver City. Licensing CAN ONLY be obtained through PetData at http://www.petdata.com/for-pet-owners/cul/ or via postal mail to:

Culver City Dog Licensing
c/o PetData
P.O. Box 141929
Irving, TX 75014 

You are still responsible for licensing any dog over the age of four months of age. Dogs over 4 months of age must be licensed every year in Culver City [Culver City Municipal Code 9.01.300]. Any person keeping or harboring any dog for 15 consecutive days shall be deemed to be the owner [Culver City Municipal Code 9.01.310]. Culver City licenses are valid for the period of only 12 months and you must renew annually [Los Angeles County Code 10.28.090]. Violations are subject to citations with fines up to $500.

You can complete a Culver City pet license via internet at: https://secure.petdata.com/petlicense/muni/cul/

For further information on pet licensing and Culver City requirements, you may also contact 1-888-615-4350 for further information.

For the Culver City license application: https://www.culvercity.org/home/showdocument?id=12458

I paid for a tag at my veterinarian's office and received a tag to put on my dog's collar. Isn't my dog now licensed?

No, the tags you may have received from the veterinarian's office are rabies tags and/or microchip tags which do NOT meet the licensing requirements in Culver City. Licensing CAN ONLY be obtained through PetData at http://www.petdata.com/for-pet-owners/cul/ or via postal mail to:

Culver City Dog Licensing
c/o PetData
P.O. Box 141929
Irving, TX 75014 

You are still responsible for licensing any dog over the age of four months of age. Dogs over 4 months of age must be licensed every year in Culver City [Culver City Municipal Code 9.01.300]. Any person keeping or harboring any dog for 15 consecutive days shall be deemed to be the owner [Culver City Municipal Code 9.01.310]. Culver City licenses are valid for the period of only 12 months and you must renew annually [Los Angeles County Code 10.28.090]. Violations are subject to citations with fines up to $500.

You can complete a Culver City pet license via internet at: https://secure.petdata.com/petlicense/muni/cul/

For further information on pet licensing and Culver City requirements, you may also contact 1-888-615-4350 for further information.

For the Culver City license application: https://www.culvercity.org/home/showdocument?id=12458

Where do the animals picked up in Culver City go?

Culver City Animal Services provides the field services and has contracted with the spcaLA Hawthorne shelter for sheltering services. All animals impounded will be transported to spcaLA Hawthorne. If the animal is injured, the animal will be transported immediately to a veterinary hospital. If the animal can be stabilized, the animal will be transported to spcaLA Hawthorne shelter. For extremely young domestic animals, strong effort is made to locate rescuers who can foster and care for the orphaned animals. For wildlife, strong effort is made to locate rehabilitators who can legally rehabilitate and care for the wildlife.

https://spcala.com/lost-pets/
Location: South Bay (for Culver City animals)
[Not the Long Beach Location]
spcaLA Hawthorne South Bay Pet Adoption Center
12910 Yukon Avenue
Hawthorne, CA 90250
(310) 676-1149
Wednesday to Sunday: 10:00 AM to 5:00 PM
Closed Mondays
Closed Tuesdays
Closed Holidays

 

I lost my pet. What do I do?

Call the Culver City Animal Services office at 310-253-6143 or e-mail at animal.services@culvercity.org. Visit the spcaLA Hawthorne shelter at 310-676-1149 or visit the shelter's website at https://spcala.com/lost-pets/. If you have a current picture of your animal or a lost animal flyer, please e-mail a copy to animal.services@culvercity.org or you can drop it off at the Culver City Police Department at 4040 Duquesne Avenue, Culver City. Remember to address your picture or flyer to the Culver City Animal Services for prompt delivery. If an animal fitting the description of your animal was picked up and impounded, you will be advised. Please be mindful that it is very difficult to identify mixed breed animals due to discrepancies and variations in descriptions. The best way to ensure the safe return of your lost animal is to have a microchip implanted and a city pet license on the animal. This is also a requirement for animals residing in Culver City. In most cases, animals wearing tags or having microchips can be returned to the owner immediately instead of being transferred to the spcaLA Hawthorne shelter. If noone is home, the officer will leave a note on the door advising that the animal was picked up. If the officer is unable to access the pet tag information immediately and cannot leave a note, the owner will be notified by telephone as soon as the information is obtained at spcaLA Hawthorne Shelter .Please remember that animals will sometimes lose their tags or have them removed by someone. Even ifyour animal leaves home wearing a collar and tags, there is always a chance the collar may not be on when the animal is picked up. Microchipping ensures that your animal has identification and your contact information even if the collar or tag is missing.

Enclosed are the contact information for the nearby shelters:

https://spcala.com/lost-pets/
Location: South Bay (for Culver City animals) [Not the Long Beach Location]
spcaLA Hawthorne South Bay Pet Adoption Center
12910 Yukon Avenue
Hawthorne, CA 90250
(310) 676-1149
Wednesday to Sunday: 10:00 AM to 5:00 PM
Closed Mondays
Closed Tuesdays
Closed Holidays

http://animalcare.lacounty.gov/view-our-animals/
County of Los Angeles Animal Care and Control Carson Shelter
216 West Victoria Street
Gardena, CA 90248
(310) 523-9566
Monday to Thursday: 12:00 PM to 7:00 PM
Friday, Saturday, and Sunday: 10:00 AM to 5:00 PM
Closed Holidays

http://www.laanimalservices.com/shelter-search-lost-pet/west-los-angeles/
Los Angeles Animal Services (Los Angeles City)
West Los Angeles Shelter
11361 West Pico Boulevard
Los Angeles, CA 90064
888-4LAPET1 or 888-452-7381
Closed Mondays
Tuesday to Saturday: 8:00 AM to 5:00 PM
Sunday: 11:00 AM to 5:00 PM

 

Besides searching the usual favorite places of your lost animal, you may want to do the following:

  1. Notify Culver City Animal Services at 310-253-6143 and submit a copy of the current lost animal's picture or lost animal flyer. If the last known location for the lost animal is near the border of Culver City and Los Angeles, notify the City of Los Angeles Animal Control West Los Angeles Shelter at 1-888-452-7381 and Los Angeles County Animal Control Carson Shelter at 310-523-9566.
  2. Contact spcaLA Hawthorne shelter at 310-676-1149 and visit the shelter at 12910 Yukon Avenue, Hawthorne, CA 90250. You can check pictures of recently impounded animals at https://spcala.com/lost-pets/.
  3. If your lost pet is microchipped, contact the corresponding microchip provider and ensure that your contact information is up-to-date. If the microchip number is a 9 to 10 character series of numbers, the likely microchip service provider is AVID at 1-800-336-2843. If the microchip number is a 10 character combination of letters and numbers or a 15 character series of numbers, the possible microchip service provider is HomeAgain at 1-888-466-3242. If the microchip number is a 15 character series of numbers, the likely microchip service provider is ResQ at 1-800-633-3796. Please note that this is not a comprehensive list of the microchip service providers. Please check your documentation that was provided by the microchip company. You can also check which microchip service provider is associated to your pet's microchip number at http://www.petmicrochiplookup.org/.
  4. If you have a lost animal flyer, you may want to e-mail, fax, and/or post the flyers at the local veterinary hospitals, animal boarding businesses, pet shops and animal grooming shops.
  •  For the flyer, include a current picture of the animal, the animal's general description, and your telephone number.
  •  Make sure the text is large enough so that the flyer can be read at a distance.
  •  DO NOT include your address or your full name, in order to avoid becoming an unwitting victim of fraudulent activity.
  •  It's also important to include any of the animal's specific identifying characteristics.
  •  Please note that it is a violation to post flyers on telephone poles and street signs.

      5.  Hire a service to help locate your animal. You can locate these service providers in the local phone book or online.

 

I found a deceased bat. What do I do?

If you find a deceased bat, do NOT handle or remove the bat [California Health and Safety Code 121600]. Immediately call the Culver City Non-Emergency Police Line at 310-837-1221. Advise the dispatcher that you have found a deceased bat and need the Culver City Animal Services Officer to pick it up.

I found a deceased animal. What do I do?

If you've found a deceased animal, please call the Culver City Non-Emergency Police Line at 310-837-1221. Make sure you report precisely where the deceased animal is by using road names, mile markers or landmarks. Please provide your phone number in case further details or description is needed. Please note that Culver City Animal Services will impound deceased domestic animals and wildlife, but not vermin or pest animals such as rats and mice. You can remove the carcass of small vermin and pest animals, except bats, as you would clean up after your pet. Use two plastic bags, place your hand in the bags like a glove, pick up the carcass with the bags, invert the bags or turn the bags inside out, tie a knot at the end of the bags, and dispose of the carcass in a trash container with a secure lid.

I found an injured animal. What do I do?

If you've found an injured animal, please call the Culver City Non-Emergency Police Line at 310-837-1221. If the Culver City Animal Services Officer is in the field or on-duty, the call will be immediately dispatched. If the Culver City Animal Services Officer is off-duty, the call will be redirected to the Los Angeles County Animal Control. Please note that you cannot help an animal if you become injured in the process. Should you succeed in getting close enough to capture an injured animal, you stand a good chance of being scratched or bitten. Make sure you report precisely where the animal is by using road names, mile markers or landmarks. Please provide your phone number in case further details or description is needed. If the animal is moving, please report the direction the animal is going or the next street or landmark the animal is heading toward. If possible, stay at the scene to keep an eye on the animal until the Culver City Animal Services Officer arrives.

I found a pet and cannot locate the owner. What do I do? What if I want to keep the pet?

Although an animal you find along the highway or in the street may turn out to be un-owned, unwanted or unclaimed, the person finding the stray dog or cat does not automatically become the owner or keeper until that person has satisfied state and/or local requirements [California Penal Code 485]. The animal is not "owned" by the finder until the holding period for strays as specified by laws has expired (4 to 6 business days, not including the day of impoundment [California Food and Agricultural Code 31108]) and the finder has made an attempt to reunite the animal with the original pet owner. Good Samaritans who have never lost a cherished companion animal may conclude that the owner of the found dog or cat callously abandoned the pet or, at the very least, neglected to keep the pet safely confined at home. But accidents can happen to anyone. The frantic owner could be looking everywhere for their beloved pet.

Please understand the limitations of animal services and shelter. Once you have taken the initiative, time and trouble to rescue a stray animal, you might be surprised to find that the rest of the pet care community might not necessarily rush forward to do what you see as its part. For instance, you can take a badly injured stray dog to animal control and find out that the agency is unable to provide expensive surgery to treat the dog's injuries. In those cases, shelters euthanize the animals to relieve them from their suffering. A cat with relatively minor injuries can be kept for only the mandated stray holding period before being euthanized.

Before you take an injured animal to a private veterinary hospital for treatment, be willing to assume financial responsibility for the animal before treatment begins. Good care is not cheap, and many veterinarians have many Good Samaritans in their waiting rooms every year. Anyone who is committed to trying to save injured stray animals should discuss these issues in advance with the veterinarian. If you're uncertain about whether or not to help an animal you see along the roadside, here's a final word of advice: First, think of what you would want the finder of your animal to do if he happened to find your pet injured without a collar.

If you've found a stray animal, chances are someone's beloved pet has gone missing. People who have lost their pets visit the local shelter every day. Taking the found pet to the shelter may be the best thing you can do for it. If it is there, the owners can reclaim it. If not, you can then adopt the pet after the mandatory hold period.

If you cannot locate the pet's owner, you may bring it to the spcaLA Hawthorne shelter or call Culver City Non-Emergency Police Line at 310-837-1221 to have the pet picked up. All Culver City animals should be taken to the contracted shelter at the spcaLA Hawthorne shelter.

Please note that by law, if you find a stray animal, you must give notice to the Culver City Animal Services within 4 hours of finding the animal [Los Angeles County Code 10.36.010].

My neighbor lets his dog poop in my yard. What do I do?

You can submit a complaint via telephone at 310-253-6143, via e-mail at animal.services@culvercity.org, or via fax at 310-253-6217 (Please ensure to attention: Culver City Animal Services)

If the Culver City Animal Services Officer observes a violation at the time of the visit, appropriate action will be taken. Because most animal ordinances are considered infractions, the Culver City Animal Services Officer cannot take any legal action unless the Officer actually witnesses a violation in progress. This does not mean nothing can be done about a violation. Residents can provide supportive evidence, photographs, video recordings, and documentation regarding a complaint to:.

Culver City Animal Services
Culver City Police Department
4040 Duquesne Avenue
Culver City, California 90232

Residents can also e-mail the information or complaint to:

animal.services@culvercity.org

Why do I have to pick up my dog's poop?

Every time it rains, thousands of pounds of pet waste wash down storm drains and into streams, rivers and lakes. If not disposed of properly, pet waste flows directly into nearby streams and creeks without being treated at wastewater treatment facilities. A recent U.S. Geological Survey study of streams and creeks showed that bacteria associated with pet waste is the source of approximately 25% of the bacteria in samples collected from local waterways.

When pet waste is disposed of improperly, water quality isn’t the only thing that suffers. Your health may also be at risk. Adults working in their gardens, children playing outside and family pets are the most at risk for infection from some of the bacteria and parasites found in pet waste.

1. Dog defecation that is not disposed of properly may be a health hazard to people and other pets.

  • Canine diseases and parasites are often shed in feces. Direct contact may put children and other dogs at risk.
  • Roundworm, hookworm and other parasitic worms may be transmitted to young children and adults who play or work in their yard/dirt when dog feces is present.
  • Ocular larva migraines (an eye disease caused by parasitic worms found in dog droppings) can cause serious eye damage to young children.
  • Storm sewers discharge rainwater and snow melt into the nearest river or lake, or directly into the ocean. Dog waste that is not picked up may be carried into the storm sewer systems by water run off and may result in water pollution and in bacterial contamination, such as elevated levels of E. coli.
  • Dog defecation contains disease-carrying bacteria and toxins that can increase the risk of viral infections, flu, and skin rashes for ocean swimmers near storm drain outlets.
  • More than 10 million gallons of water containing fecal contaminants from human and animal sources, flows into neighborhood storm drains every day.

2. Dog defecation may be a health hazard to your own dog.

  • Removing dog feces prevents re-infestation of your dog from exposure to infective worm eggs and larvae.
  • Roundworm, hookworm and other parasitic worms can easily be transmitted back to your own dog and other dogs.

3. It's the law! Violations are subject to citations with fines up to $500.

  • Los Angeles County Code 10.40.066 Waste Removal
    • A person who owns or has custody of a dog shall immediately remove and dispose of in a sanitary manner, by placing in an appropriate device and depositing in a sanitary receptacle, any feces deposited by such dog on any public or private property without the consent of the person in lawful possession of the property.
    • A person who has custody of a dog shall carry an appropriate device to pick up dog feces during all times when the dog is not on the premises of its owner or custodian.
    • Exception: The provisions of this Section shall not apply to a blind person being accompanied by a guide dog.
  • Culver City Municipal Code 9.10.400 Rules and Regulations
    • The person who has charge, care, custody or control of any dog is required to pick-up and dispose of the dog's feces in trash receptacles both in and out of the Dog Park.
  • Dog defecation is a nuisance.
    • No one enjoys maneuvering around piles of dog waste.
    • In addition to being unsightly, the odor from dog feces is unpleasant and may attract flies.
    • When it's your dog on your neighbor's lawn, it causes a great deal of hostility--toward you, and your dog. After a day of baking in the sun, the odor from dog feces can become offensive. It can ruin a good pair of shoes. Kids play on the grass, and families enjoy picnicking. Dog feces takes the joy out of outdoors activities.
    • Dog feces and urine are highly acidic and are very harmful to your lawn.
    • Dog food has animal proteins in it that make your dog's waste damaging to plants and landscapes.

Does Culver City have a "poop scooper" ordinance?

Yes, Culver City requires the owner to clean up after his dog on private and public property. The owner must carry something to pick up and carry the dog waste which must be properly disposed of. Violations are subject to citations with fines up to $500.

1. Los Angeles County Code 10.40.066 Waste Removal

  • A person who owns or has custody of a dog is required to remove the dog’s feces immediately from public property or private property not owned or possessed by the owner or custodian of the dog.
  • The feces must be disposed of in a sanitary manner.
  • Exception: The provisions of this Section shall not apply to a visually-impaired person with a guide dog.

2. Culver City Municipal Code 9.10.400 Rules and Regulations

  • The person who has charge, care, custody or control of any dog is required to pick-up and dispose of the dog's feces in trash receptacles both in and out of the Dog Park.

What questions can a business' employees ask to determine if a dog is a service animal?

In situations where it is not obvious that the dog is a service animal, staff may ask only two specific questions:

1) Is the dog a service animal required because of a disability? 

2) What work or task has the dog been trained to perform?

Staff are not allowed to request any documentation for the dog, require that the dog demonstrate its task, or inquire about the nature of the person's disability.

For a flyer on more information from the ADA: https://www.culvercitypd.org/Home/ShowDocument?id=12958

 

Are emotional support, therapy, comfort, or companion animals considered service animals under the ADA?

No.  These terms are used to describe animals that provide comfort just by being with a person.  Because they have not been trained to perform a specific job or task, they do not qualify as service animals under the ADA. 

For a flyer on more information from the ADA: https://www.culvercitypd.org/Home/ShowDocument?id=12958

 

Culver City requires all dogs over the age of 4 months to be rabies vaccinated. Does this apply to my service animal?

Yes.  Individuals who have service animals are not exempt from local animal control or public health requirements.

For a flyer on more information from the ADA: https://www.culvercitypd.org/Home/ShowDocument?id=12958

 

Culver City requires all dogs over the age of 4 months to be licensed. Does this apply to my service animal?

Yes.  Service animals are subject to local dog licensing and registration requirements.

For a flyer on more information from the ADA: https://www.culvercitypd.org/Home/ShowDocument?id=12958

You may be exempt from paying the dog license fee if:

  • You are a resident of Culver City who meets the criterion of Disability, as established by the Social Security Administration’s Supplemental Security income (SSI) Program for the Aged, Blind,
    and Disabled (Title SVI of the Social Security Act as amended), without regard to your age.

To apply:

1. Please fill out the Pet License Fee Exemption Application: https://www.culvercity.org/Home/ShowDocument?id=12457

2. Include proof of SSI disability. This paperwork will be returned and will not be required again.

3. Include a current rabies certificate for each pet to be license, or proof from your veterinarian of exemption (if applicable).

4. Include each pet's microchip number, or proof from your veterinarian of exemption (if applicable).

  

 

What does "under control" mean for a service animal?

The ADA requires that service animals be under the control of the handler at all times. In most instances, the handler will be the individual with a disability or a third party who accompanies the individual with a disability. In the school (K-12) context and in similar settings, the school or similar entity may need to provide some assistance to enable a particular student to handle his or her service animal. The service animal must be harnessed, leashed, or tethered while in public places unless these devices interfere with the service animal's work or the person's disability prevents use of these devices. In that case, the person must use voice, signal, or other effective means to maintain control of the animal. For example, a person who uses a wheelchair may use a long, retractable leash to allow her service animal to pick up or retrieve items. She may not allow the dog to wander away from her and must maintain control of the dog, even if it is retrieving an item at a distance from her. A returning veteran who has PTSD and has great difficulty entering unfamiliar spaces may have a dog that is trained to enter a space, check to see that no threats are there, and come back and signal that it is safe to enter. The dog must be off leash to do its job, but may be leashed at other times. Under control also means that a service animal should not be allowed to bark repeatedly in a lecture hall, theater, library, or other quiet place. However, if a dog barks just once, or barks because someone has provoked it, this would not mean that the dog is out of control.

For a flyer on more information from the ADA: https://www.culvercitypd.org/Home/ShowDocument?id=12958

 

What can a business' staff do when a service animal is being disruptive?

If a service animal is out of control and the handler does not take effective action to control it, staff may request that the animal be removed from the premises.

For a flyer on more information from the ADA: https://www.culvercitypd.org/Home/ShowDocument?id=12958

 

Do service animals have to be on a leash?

The ADA requires that service animals be under the control of the handler at all times. In most instances, the handler will be the individual with a disability or a third party who accompanies the individual with a disability. In the school (K-12) context and in similar settings, the school or similar entity may need to provide some assistance to enable a particular student to handle his or her service animal. The service animal must be harnessed, leashed, or tethered while in public places unless these devices interfere with the service animal's work or the person's disability prevents use of these devices. In that case, the person must use voice, signal, or other effective means to maintain control of the animal. For example, a person who uses a wheelchair may use a long, retractable leash to allow her service animal to pick up or retrieve items. She may not allow the dog to wander away from her and must maintain control of the dog, even if it is retrieving an item at a distance from her. Or, a returning veteran who has PTSD and has great difficulty entering unfamiliar spaces may have a dog that is trained to enter a space, check to see that no threats are there, and come back and signal that it is safe to enter. The dog must be off leash to do its job, but may be leashed at other times.

For a flyer on more information from the ADA: https://www.culvercitypd.org/Home/ShowDocument?id=12958

Do apartments, mobile home parks, and other residential properties have to comply with the ADA?

The ADA applies to housing programs administered by state and local governments, such as public housing authorities, and by places of public accommodation, such as public and private universities.  In addition, the Fair Housing Act applies to virtually all types of housing, both public and privately-owned, including housing covered by the ADA.  Under the Fair Housing Act, housing providers are obligated to permit, as a reasonable accommodation, the use of animals that work, provide assistance, or perform tasks that benefit persons with a disabilities, or provide emotional support to alleviate a symptom or effect of a disability. 

For information about these Fair Housing Act requirements see HUD’s Notice on Service Animals and Assistance Animals for People with Disabilities in Housing and HUD-funded Programs: ttps://www.culvercitypd.org/Home/ShowDocument?id=12962

 

 

What happens if a person thinks a business' staff has discriminated against him or her because of a service animal?

Individuals who believe that they have been illegally denied access or service because they use service animals may file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Justice.  Individuals also have the right to file a private lawsuit in Federal court charging the entity with discrimination under the ADA.

For a flyer on more information from the ADA: https://www.culvercitypd.org/Home/ShowDocument?id=12958

 

Culver City requires all dogs over the age of 4 months to be spayed/neutered (altered). Does this apply to my service animal?

No.  Service animals are subject to local dog licensing and registration requirements, but there are exemptions to this spay/neuter ordinance[Los Angeles County Code 10.20.350]:

  1. Dogs which are unable to be spayed or neutered without a high likelihood of suffering serious bodily harm or death due to age or infirmity (Written confirmation from a licensed veterinarian is required to qualify for this exception.)
  2. Dogs used by law enforcement agencies for law enforcement purposes
  3. Service or assistance dogs that assist disabled persons
  4. Competition dogs (A Competition Dog is a dog which is used to show, to compete or to breed, which is of a breed recognized by and registered with the American Kennel Club (AKC), United Kennel Club (UKC), American Dog Breeders Association (ADBA) or other approved breed registries. The dog or owner must also meet ONE of the following requirements:
  • The dog has competed in at least one dog show or sporting competition sanctioned by a national registry or approved by the department within the last 365 days
  • The dog has earned a conformation, obedience, agility, carting, herding, protection, rally, sporting, working or other title from a purebred dog registry referenced above or  other registry or dog sport association approved by the department
  • The owner or custodian of the dog is a member of a department approved purebred dog breed clubs, which maintains and enforces a code of ethics for dog breeding that includes restrictions from breeding dogs with genetic defects and life threatening health problems that commonly threaten the breed.

If your dog meets one of these exemptions, please complete the following application: https://www.culvercity.org/Home/ShowDocument?id=12457

What is a service animal?

Under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), a service animal is defined as a dog that has been individually trained to do work or perform tasks for an individual with a disability.  The task(s) performed by the dog must be directly related to the person's disability.

For a flyer on more information from the ADA: https://www.culvercitypd.org/Home/ShowDocument?id=12958

 

Do the service animals have to be quiet and not bark?

The ADA requires that service animals be under the control of the handler at all times. In most instances, the handler will be the individual with a disability or a third party who accompanies the individual with a disability. The service animal must be harnessed, leashed, or tethered while in public places unless these devices interfere with the service animal's work or the person's disability prevents use of these devices. In that case, the person must use voice, signal, or other effective means to maintain control of the animal. Under control also means that a service animal should not be allowed to bark repeatedly in a lecture hall, theater, library, or other quiet place. However, if a dog barks just once, or barks because someone has provoked it, this would not mean that the dog is out of control.

For a flyer on more information from the ADA: https://www.culvercitypd.org/Home/ShowDocument?id=12958

 

What does it mean to be "trained to do work or perform tasks" for a service animal?

The dog must be trained to take a specific action when needed to assist the person with a disability. For example, a person with diabetes may have a dog that is trained to alert him when his blood sugar reaches high or low levels. A person with depression may have a dog that is trained to remind her to take her medication. A person who has epilepsy may have a dog that is trained to detect the onset of a seizure and then help the person remain safe during the seizure.

For a flyer on more information from the ADA: https://www.culvercitypd.org/Home/ShowDocument?id=12958

 

Where do the animals picked up in Culver City go?

Culver City Animal Services provides the field services and has contracted with the spcaLA Hawthorne shelter for sheltering services. All animals impounded will be transported to spcaLA Hawthorne. If the animal is injured, the animal will be transported immediately to a veterinary hospital. If the animal can be stabilized, the animal will be transported to spcaLA Hawthorne shelter. For extremely young domestic animals, strong effort is made to locate rescuers who can foster and care for the orphaned animals. For wildlife, strong effort is made to locate rehabilitators who can legally rehabilitate and care for the wildlife.

https://spcala.com/lost-pets/
Location: South Bay (for Culver City animals)
[Not the Long Beach Location]
spcaLA Hawthorne South Bay Pet Adoption Center
12910 Yukon Avenue
Hawthorne, CA 90250
(310) 676-1149
Wednesday to Sunday: 10:00 AM to 5:00 PM
Closed Mondays
Closed Tuesdays
Closed Holidays

 

Where is the spcaLA Hawthorne shelter located?

The spcaLA Hawthorne shelter is located at the South Bay Pet Adoption Center on 12910 Yukon Avenue between El Segundo Avenue and West 135th Street in Hawthorne. You can reach the shelter at 310-676-1149.

https://spcala.com/

 

Does the spcaLA have any programs available to help me board my animals for free if I am in a domestic violence situation?

Yes, the spcaLA has a program to assist people who are victims of domestic violence. 

When domestic violence occurs, pets are often threatened or harmed by the violent partner. By providing shelter and care for pets, Animal Safety Net (ASM)™ helps survivors leave an abusive home and go to a domestic violence shelter without the fear that their animals may be left behind in a dangerous environment. ASN assists many domestic violence survivors by offering temporary housing for their pets, taking them out of harm’s way, and allowing domestic violence survivors to relocate to a shelter. The goal of ASN is to reunite people with their pets once they are safely out of the domestic violence shelter.

spcaLA understands how traumatic domestic violence is and is proud to assist survivors.  

Please contact the Animal Safety Net regarding required documentation and further details at 323-733‐0219.

Does the spcaLA offer boarding for animals?

Yes, the spcaLA Pet Hotel at 7700 East Spring Street, Long Beach, boards animals. The spcaLA Pet Hotel offers indoor kennels with outdoor access for dogs and private, roomy cat condos for cats. Cats can lounge in the secure, open-air atrium for play time. Dogs can enjoy big play yards with real grass. Please call 562-206-1375  or obtain further information at:  

https://spcala.com/programs-services/pet-hotel/accommodations/

Can I adopt a pet from the Culver City Animal Services?

Culver City has contracted with the spcaLA Hawthorne shelter for sheltering services. The spcaLA Hawthorne shelter is located at the South Bay Pet Adoption Center on 12910 Yukon Avenue between El Segundo Avenue and West 135th Street in Hawthorne. You can reach the shelter at 310‐676‐1149. Please check with the spcaLA Hawthorne shelter regarding fees for adopting animals.

Please go to: https://spcala.com/

My pet is old and sick. I need to have my pet put to sleep. Does the spcaLA Hawthorne shelter do this?

Yes, please call the spcaLA Hawthorne shelter at 310-676-1149 for details.

Does the spcaLA Hawthorne shelter offer microchipping to the public?

The spcaLA South Bay Pet Adoption center hosts Low Cost Vaccine and Microchip Clinics twice a year.

Please call the spcaLA Hawthorne shelter at 310-676-1149 for further details.

Can I leave information or a flyer about my lost pet at the spcaLA Hawthorne shelter?

Yes, spcaLA Hawthorne shelter has a lost and found poster board and book. It is your responsibility, as the owner, to check the shelter on a daily basis for your lost pet.

Can I place a hold for an animal I am interested in?

Please call the spcaLA Hawthorne shelter at 310-676-1149 to place a 24-hour hold.

Is declawing a cat legal in Culver City?

No. Per Culver City Municipal Code 9.01.600, no person, licensed medical professional or otherwise, shall perform or cause to be performed an onychectomy (declawing) or flexor tendonectomy procedure by any means on any animal within the City, except when necessary for a therapeutic purpose.

Therapeutic purpose means the necessity to address the medical condition of the animal, such as an existing or recurring illness, infection, disease, injury or abnormal condition in the claw that compromises the animal's health. Therapeutic purpose does not include cosmetic or aesthetic reasons or reasons of convenience in keeping or handling the animal.

A violation of this ordinance is a misdemeanor.

 

I think that my neighbor is hoarding animals. What do I do?

Animal hoarding is a complex and intricate public health and community issue. Its effects are far-reaching and encompass mental health, animal welfare and public safety concerns.

The following criteria are used to define animal hoarding:

  1. More than the typical number of companion animals such as cats and/or dogs
  2. Inability to provide even minimal standards of nutrition, sanitation, shelter and veterinary care, with this neglect often resulting in starvation, illness and death
  3. Denial of the inability to provide this minimum care and the impact of that failure on the animals, the household and human occupants of the dwelling

If you think someone you know is struggling with animal hoarding, you can submit a complaint via telephone at 310-253-6143, via e-mail at animal.services@culvercity.org, or via fax at 310-253-6217 (Please ensure to attention: Culver City Animal Services).

If the Culver City Animal Services Officer observes a violation or the cruelty incident at the time of the visit, appropriate action will be taken. Because most animal ordinances are considered infractions and misdemeanors, the Culver City Animal Services Officer cannot take any legal action unless the Officer actually witnesses a violation in progress. This does not mean nothing can be done about a violation.

To assist in the investigation, residents can provide supportive evidence, photographs, video recordings, and documentation regarding a complaint to:

Culver City Animal Services
Culver City Police Department
4040 Duquesne Avenue
Culver City, California 90232

Residents can also e-mail the information or complaint to:

animal.services@culvercity.org

My cat/dog attacked a bird. What do I do?

Any bird that has been caught or attacked by a dog or cat must receive specialized care. Cats and dogs have bacteria (germs) in their mouths that will cause a bird to die, usually within 3 days, if left untreated. Call the Culver City Animal Services at 310-837-1221. The baby bird will be transferred to a licensed wildlife rehabilitator or a veterinary hospital.

Do you rent out humane traps for stray and feral cats?

Yes, Culver City Animal Services provides humane traps to residents for stray, injured and feral cats. Humane traps may not be used for healthy wildlife animals. Depending on the availability, humane traps may be available to assist you with catching stray or feral cats. There is a $25.00 a week rental fee and a contractual agreement for usage of the humane trap. You will be given instructions for setting the trap. The humane trap can only be used to trap the specified target animal. The Animal Services Officer will ONLY impound the specified target cat caught in the trap upon notification.

Is it illegal to feed stray and feral cats?

Feeding stray cats, feral cats and wildlife animals falls under the Title 14 California Code of Regulations 251.1 Harassment of Animals. This section applies to the feral cat feeders because wild animals have access to the food as well. If the act of the feeding is intentional, it does not matter that the food was intended for feral cats if wildlife animals have access [California Code of Regulations 251.1].

Per California Code of Regulations 251.1, "harassment" is defined as:

  •  An intentional act which disrupts an animal's normal behavior patterns, which includes, but is not limited to, breeding, feeding or sheltering.

Feeding the stray cats in the neighborhood can also violate the kennel ordinances. Even if you don't claim ownership of the cats, by providing food, water and/or shelter for the cats, you are technically "keeping" them. If there are more than 3 adult cats on your property and you are feeding them without having an approved Culver City Animal Permit, you can receive a citation for kennel violation with fines up to $500 [Culver City Municipal Code 9.01.020].

Can I trap stray cats that come in my yard?

Yes, as long as you use a humane trap that does not injure the animal. Culver City Animal Services provides humane traps to residents for stray, injured and feral cats. Humane traps may not be used for healthy wildlife animals. Depending on the availability, humane traps may be available to assist you with catching stray or feral cats. There is a $25.00 a week rental fee and a contractual agreement for usage of the humane trap. You will be given instructions for setting the trap. The humane trap can only be used to trap the specified target animal. The Animal Services Officer will ONLY impound the specified target cat caught in the trap upon notification.

There are lots of stray cats in my neighborhood. Are these all feral cats? Any suggestion on how to keep stray or feral cats off my property?

Culver City Animal Services receives numerous calls from individuals who have noticed cats roaming freely in their neighborhoods. Although there are isolated colonies of feral cats in Culver City, it is more likely that some of these cats may be owned pets that are permitted by their caretakers to go outside unsupervised; some may be tame stray cats that were formerly owned, but have been lost or abandoned; and some may be feral cats (cats with no socialization and dispositions that make them unsuitable as domestic pets).

There are a number of humane ways for dealing with stray cats which will keep them out of your yard, ranging from establishing plants which cats generally do not like to working with your neighbors on a stray cat trapping program. In any case, it is important to remember that while stray cats can be very frustrating to deal with, you should not use extreme measures, as these measures can hurt people's pets and wildlife which live in the neighborhood.

If you have stray cats in the area, the first step should be preventing more from moving in. If someone in the area feeds the cats, you may want to ask them to stop, explaining that the stray cats are causing problems for all of the neighbors. You can also advise Culver City Animal Services and we will address the issue with the feeder. By fixing the issue with the cats, you will discourage more animals from appearing. Any strays which are currently setting up camp in the area should be trapped, altered, and vaccinated; you may be able to find a local humane association which will trap and relocate the cats for you, or at least provide grant money for altering the cats so that they will not breed.

The Culver City Animal Services provides humane traps to residents for sick or injured dogs and cats. Depending on the availability, humane traps may be available to assist you with catching stray or feral cats. There is a $25.00 a week rental fee and a contractual agreement for usage of the humane trap. The humane trap can only be used to trap the specified target animal. The Animal Services Officer will only impound the specified target dog or cat caught in the trap upon notification. You will be given instructions for setting the trap or can reference them here:

https://www.culvercity.org/Home/ShowDocument?id=12455

There are also some steps which you can take to keep stray cats out of your yard and garden:

  1. Make your garden hostile to cats, with no spaces to lounge or to use your yard as a bathroom.
  2. Plant things to discourage cats, such as geranium, pennyroyal, rue, lavender, garlic, lemon thyme, lemon verbena, and other strongly scented plants.
  3. Lay chicken wire in your flower beds, as cats dislike like walking on wire.
  4. Lay pine cones, nut shells, and short stakes to discourage cats from walking in your yard.
  5. Lay coffee grounds and eggshells (which work well as fertilizer) as cats also do not like walking on these items.
  6. Install a motion-activated or motion-sensored sprinkler device. You can find these devices in pet stores, home improvement stores and online. These are extremely effective in keeping cats out of yards or large areas.

Is there a leash law on cats? Are cats allowed to roam free?

There is a leash law in Culver City, but it only applies to dogs. In the city limits of Culver City, cats are recognized as free-roaming animals, whether the cats are owned, stray, wild or feral. Unlike dogs, cats may roam freely throughout the city, are not required to be on a leash, and do not need to be confined within the owner's property.

What are the Culver City Municipal Codes regarding animals?

You can access Title 9 of the municipal codes for Culver City by going to the link below:

http://www.amlegal.com/codes/client/culver-city_ca/

For a brochure on the Culver City Municipal Codes regarding the most common violations regarding animals:

https://www.culvercity.org/home/showdocument?id=12459

What can a business' staff do when a service animal is being disruptive?

If a service animal is out of control and the handler does not take effective action to control it, staff may request that the animal be removed from the premises.

For a flyer on more information from the ADA: https://www.culvercitypd.org/Home/ShowDocument?id=12958

 

Do service animals have to be on a leash?

The ADA requires that service animals be under the control of the handler at all times. In most instances, the handler will be the individual with a disability or a third party who accompanies the individual with a disability. In the school (K-12) context and in similar settings, the school or similar entity may need to provide some assistance to enable a particular student to handle his or her service animal. The service animal must be harnessed, leashed, or tethered while in public places unless these devices interfere with the service animal's work or the person's disability prevents use of these devices. In that case, the person must use voice, signal, or other effective means to maintain control of the animal. For example, a person who uses a wheelchair may use a long, retractable leash to allow her service animal to pick up or retrieve items. She may not allow the dog to wander away from her and must maintain control of the dog, even if it is retrieving an item at a distance from her. Or, a returning veteran who has PTSD and has great difficulty entering unfamiliar spaces may have a dog that is trained to enter a space, check to see that no threats are there, and come back and signal that it is safe to enter. The dog must be off leash to do its job, but may be leashed at other times.

For a flyer on more information from the ADA: https://www.culvercitypd.org/Home/ShowDocument?id=12958

Do apartments, mobile home parks, and other residential properties have to comply with the ADA?

The ADA applies to housing programs administered by state and local governments, such as public housing authorities, and by places of public accommodation, such as public and private universities.  In addition, the Fair Housing Act applies to virtually all types of housing, both public and privately-owned, including housing covered by the ADA.  Under the Fair Housing Act, housing providers are obligated to permit, as a reasonable accommodation, the use of animals that work, provide assistance, or perform tasks that benefit persons with a disabilities, or provide emotional support to alleviate a symptom or effect of a disability. 

For information about these Fair Housing Act requirements see HUD’s Notice on Service Animals and Assistance Animals for People with Disabilities in Housing and HUD-funded Programs: ttps://www.culvercitypd.org/Home/ShowDocument?id=12962

 

 

What happens if a person thinks a business' staff has discriminated against him or her because of a service animal?

Individuals who believe that they have been illegally denied access or service because they use service animals may file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Justice.  Individuals also have the right to file a private lawsuit in Federal court charging the entity with discrimination under the ADA.

For a flyer on more information from the ADA: https://www.culvercitypd.org/Home/ShowDocument?id=12958

 

Do the service animals have to be quiet and not bark?

The ADA requires that service animals be under the control of the handler at all times. In most instances, the handler will be the individual with a disability or a third party who accompanies the individual with a disability. The service animal must be harnessed, leashed, or tethered while in public places unless these devices interfere with the service animal's work or the person's disability prevents use of these devices. In that case, the person must use voice, signal, or other effective means to maintain control of the animal. Under control also means that a service animal should not be allowed to bark repeatedly in a lecture hall, theater, library, or other quiet place. However, if a dog barks just once, or barks because someone has provoked it, this would not mean that the dog is out of control.

For a flyer on more information from the ADA: https://www.culvercitypd.org/Home/ShowDocument?id=12958

 

What is animal cruelty?

Animal cruelty encompasses a range of behaviors harmful to animals, from neglect to malicious killing. Most cruelty investigated is unintentional neglect that can be resolved through education. Intentional cruelty can run the gamut from knowingly depriving an animal of food, water, shelter, or veterinary care to maliciously torturing, maiming, mutilating, or killing an animal [California Penal Code 597.1]. Inflicting inhumane pain or suffering or failing to provide veterinary care also constitutes animal cruelty.

Violations should be reported by calling Culver City Animal Services at 310-837-1221 or via e-mail at:

animal.services@culvercity.org

How can you help us resolve difficult problems when an Officer does not observe a violation?

If the Culver City Animal Services Officer observes a violation at the time of the visit, appropriate action will be taken.  To assist in the investigation, residents can provide supportive evidence, photographs, video recordings, and documentation regarding a complaint to:

Culver City Animal Services
Culver City Police Department
4040 Duquesne Avenue
Culver City, California 90232

Residents can also e-mail the information or complaint to:

animal.services@culvercity.org

What is an appeal hearing?

 An appeal hearing is a formal hearing conducted by a Hearing Officer to accept testimony, under oath, from all interested parties when a determination of violation validity has been appealed. If you are issued an Administrative Citation and you believe that it was issued in error, you have the right to contest an Administrative Citation and request a hearing before a Hearing Officer by completing and filing a Request for Hearing within 15 days from the date of the issuance of the Administrative Citation. However, there are acceptable grounds for an appeal. Unacceptable grounds of appeal of a citation will result in a determination that the citation is upheld and the forfeiture of your deposit.

The administrative appeal process includes three levels of appeal:

  1. Administrative Review
  2. Administrative Hearing
  3. Appeal through the Superior Court

For the Administrative Review and Hearing, there are acceptable grounds for an appeal. Unacceptable grounds of appeal of a citation will result in a determination that the citation is upheld and the forfeiture of your deposit.

The following are acceptable grounds of appeal of a citation:

  • No violation of the Culver City animal regulation(s) was committed. (Example: You were cited for your dog off-leash, but your dog was on leash.)
  • You were not the individual indicated on the Administration Citation who committed the violation. (Example: You were cited for your dog running at large, but you don't own any dogs.)

The following are not acceptable grounds for appeal of a citation:

  • Lack of knowledge of the Culver City animal regulations (Example: You were cited for your dog off-leash on your unfenced front lawn, but you state that you did not know that you weren't allowed to have your dog off-leash if your own property is not fenced in.)
  • Disapproval with the Culver City animal regulations (Example: You were cited for your dog in Tellefson Park, but you don't think that dogs should not be allowed in Culver City parks.)

For questions regarding this citation, please call 310-253-5940.

How do I file a complaint about an animal?

You can call at 310-253-6143 for general information, license questions, report lost and found animals, or obtain assistance with animal-related issues. For immediate or emergency field services, please call the Culver City Non-Emergency Police Line at 310-837-1221. If the Culver City Animal Services Officer is in the field or on-duty, the call will be dispatched to the Animal Services Officer. If the Culver City Animal Services Officer is off-duty, the call will be redirected to the Los Angeles County Animal Control. Because most animal ordinances are considered infractions, the Culver City Animal Services Officer cannot take any legal action unless the Officer actually witnesses a violation in progress. This does not mean nothing can be done about a violation. Residents can provide supportive evidence, photographs, video recordings, and documentation regarding a complaint to:

Culver City Animal Services
Culver City Police Department
4040 Duquesne Avenue
Culver City, California 90232

Residents can also e-mail the information or complaint to:

animal.services@culvercity.org

What is coyote "hazing"?

Coyote hazing simply means scaring a coyote away from you, your yard, or your neighborhood. Coyotes are members of the dog family, and just as we train our dogs to adopt good behavior, we can reinforce a coyote’s natural instinct to avoid people without harming the coyote.

Hazing involves asserting yourself by reacting to the inappropriate presence of a coyote so that it is frightened or startled and leaves the area.

Hazing Techniques include:

  • Yelling and waving arms
  • Responding aggressively
  • Banging pots and pans
  • Using squirt guns or garden hoses
  • Throwing tennis balls or rocks
  • Utilizing whistles or air horns

Hazing Tools include:

  • Noise Makers: 
    • Your loud voice
    • Whistles
    • Bells
    • Pots
    • Shaker cans (soda can filled with pennies and wrapped with aluminum foil)
    • Slapping a newspaper against your thigh
  • Surprises: 
    • Pop-up umbrella
    • Motion-activated lights or sprinklers
    • Garden hose
    • Supersoaker spray gun filled with vinegar water

Hazing Tips include:

  • Stand your ground.
    • Make eye contact. Advance toward the coyote with your hazing tools (such as pans, water squirt gun, umbrella, can with coins) if there is hesitation on the part of the coyote
    • Make sure the coyote is focused on you as the source of danger or discomfort. Do not haze from buildings or your car where the coyote can’t see you clearly.
  • Make it multisensory.
    • Use tools that scare with sound, light and motion.
  • Variety is essential.
    • Coyotes can learn to recognize and avoid individual people, so the more often a coyote has a negative experience with various hazing tool and different people, the faster he will change his behavior to avoid human contact.

For more information on coyote hazing: http://www.culvercitypd.org/Home/ShowDocument?id=12972

To report the coyote sighting or incident: https://www.culvercitypd.org/Home/ShowDocument?id=12974

 

What are the dangers of feeding wildlife?

People who feed wildlife almost always have good intentions but are unaware of the long and short-term consequences of providing supplemental food.

Feeding wildlife creates: 

Loss of foraging skills

• Feeding wildlife is especially dangerous for young animals that become dependent on humans for food and may not learn to hunt and forage on their own. This may lead to starvation, which is a cruel death sentence.

• If you are feeding, taper off the amount of food you are supplying to avoid desperate, panicked wildlife, and give them time to adapt. Depending on the species, that may mean 8-12 weeks or even longer. This allows wildlife to relearn how to forage for natural foods and will help prevent conflicts with others.

 

Loss of fear of humans/habituation

• Fed raccoons and coyotes may frequent decks, and approach people, cats and small dogs

• Habituation often leads to heartbreak: Someone will find and raise a wild baby and then bring the animal to a wildlife rehabilitator asking if he or she can be wilded up and released. The answer is almost always no. That animal has not been taught to avoid humans and has more than likely been fed an improper diet (see next point).

 

Inadequate nutrition

• Supplemental food provided to wildlife very rarely consists of the natural foods wildlife would find while foraging. This can lead to malnutrition and oddly enough, even emaciation.

• Bread fed to ducks and waterfowl can lead to “angel wing” aka “slipped wing” or “crooked wing.” This condition causes the last joint of the wing to twist which results in a bird’s primary/flight feathers sticking out. Angel wing prevents affected birds from flying, which means they cannot escape predators (including people) and cannot migrate. The primary cause of angel wing is too much protein, although it can also be genetic. A natural diet prevents this condition which can sometimes be fixed in rehabilitation.

• White bread causes a deficiency of Vitamin E in birds. A natural diet of leaves, seeds and aquatic plants provides a high level of Vitamin E.

• Ducklings and goslings may be fed tremendous amounts of bread in urban and suburban areas

• Growing baby birds may fail to get the proper nutrients for healthy growth and development

 

Spread of disease

• Wildlife is opportunistic and will take advantage of the most convenient food source available.

• Feeding leads to higher concentrations of animals and interaction with other species. In these higher population concentrations, diseases spread more rampantly, examples: salmonella, distemper and trichomoniasis.

• Competition for free and easy food can also lead to aggression between animals.

 

Interference with migratory patterns

Seasonal changes in food supplies are one of the things that signal to animals that it is time to migrate. Canada Geese, gulls, even some songbirds may not migrate if supplemental food is available.

• This increases competition for food for exhausted animals migrating through

 

Disturbs natural balance and leads to overpopulation

• In the wild, the number of animals being born is directly related to the amount of natural food available to the parents. The number of young that survive will also depend on how much food is available which is nature’s way of balancing populations when availability of natural foods cannot support larger numbers.

• Overpopulation leads to more competition for food which can lead to aggression between animals.

 

Loss of biodiversity and destruction of habitat

• Wildlife has learned how to thrive amongst people and many animals have become overpopulated in urban areas, including rats, pigeons, gulls, raccoons, skunks and opossums.

• Loss or degradation of habitat has accounted for 88% of the endangered or threatened animals listed in the US. However, some species thrive among people and have become overpopulated in urban areas.

 

Creates nuisance wildlife

• Consider for a moment what happens when the feeder is away, moves or stops feeding?

• Fed wildlife will identify people as a source of free and easy food and may even approach people for handouts. When others are not as tolerant about wildlife visiting the area, this may result in serious consequences and potentially a cruel death for the animal.

 

Notes

Trapping and relocating (even with live humane cage traps) is NOT an effective or humane method for solving conflicts with wildlife. Relocating wildlife creates orphans, is inhumane and is illegal in California. 50-75% of relocated animals die of starvation, dehydration and injuries sustained from territory disputes. There is no guarantee the captured animal is the actual animal causing the conflict.

Most people that feed wildlife think they are doing the animals a kindness. Certainly the animals respond eagerly to hand-outs, and for many people, feeding is their opportunity to see wildlife up close. Most people who feed also think that the small amount of food they hand out won't make a difference, not realizing that dozens of other people come to the same conclusion, so the animals are actually eating a diet primarily made up of human foods.

Please review this flyer:

https://www.culvercity.org/Home/ShowDocument?id=12952

 

I think that I saw a coyote. What should I do if I see a coyote?

  • Do not turn and run. Running may trigger the coyote to chase you and coyotes can sprint at up to 40 mph.

  • Never let a coyote go by without trying to scare it.

  • Teach children never to approach coyotes just as you would warn them about stray dogs.

  • Make yourself appear larger by raising your arms and waving them. If you have a jacket or belt with you, wave it around over your head and yell in a loud low tone at the coyote.

  • Stomp your foot and clap your hands to scare them.

  • Keep your pet leashed and close to you and be aware of your surroundings when walking. Coyotes may pop up anywhere, so always look far ahead of you and glance back often. Avoid establishing a regular routine for walking as coyotes pick up on patterns and may follow you. They associate the presence of people with food. Alternate directions of your travel and the times you walk if possible.

  • Make a coyote shaker can by taking a steel or high density aluminum can and placing a few coins in it. Tape the hole shut. It can then be shaken and even thrown in the direction of the coyote to scare it away.

  • Carry a walking stick or large colorful umbrella when out on walks so that you can use it to fend off an animal. An open umbrella, for example, presents you as being much larger than the animal and may frighten it away.

  • Wear clothes with striking colors when walking.

  • A whistle, air horn, or thrown golf ball may be used to frighten off a wild animal. Wear a waist pack and keep some of these items in it.

  • For coyotes observed at your property, make a wildlife scare kit and keep it by the door to your yard. Include items such as air horns, whistles, 2 small pans to bang together, a bullhorn to yell at the coyote through, baseballs and golf balls to throw, a disposable camera with flash as the flash may scare the coyote, and/or a fire extinguisher which may be used to scare off an animal.

For more information on coyote hazing: http://www.culvercitypd.org/Home/ShowDocument?id=12972

To report the coyote sighting or incident: https://www.culvercitypd.org/Home/ShowDocument?id=12974

 

 

What are the recommended guidelines to coexist with coyotes?

  • Do not leave small children and pets (even if pets are caged) unattended outdoors.

  • Should you have to maintain your pet outdoors and you have the room to do so, consider the placement of an enclosed dog or cat run adequate in size to allow your pet exercise. The run should contain a 6 sided shelter and potable water and have some shade to protect your pet from direct sunlight.

  • Do not encourage, entice, approach or feed mammalian wildlife such as coyotes. It is a violation of the law. (Los Angeles County Code 10.84.010)

  • Please remove your pet’s food dish or bowl when your pet has finished eating and do not leave any unattended food outdoors.

  • Pick up all fallen fruit & berries from your yard. If possible, do not leave ripened fruit on branches. Trim ground level shrubbery and low hanging branches.

  • Enclose or remove wood piles.

  • Do not compost human food items.

  • Enclose vegetable gardens with sturdy welded wire mesh or greenhouse.

  • Clear dense vegetation to reduce wildlife hiding places.

  • Secure crawl spaces such as access ways under the house, decks, and porches by screening off with high gauge welded wire mesh where possible. Do not use chicken wire as most wildlife can chew right through it.

  • Block access under storage sheds and containers.

  • Clean all grills or barbecues after use.

  • Secure or store trash containers in enclosed structures or securely strap down the lids. Do not place refuse containers out until the day of service. Spray ammonia occasionally in the trash to cut down on food odors. Canned goods, water bottles, soda cans, soaps, cosmetics, toiletries, and trash, unwashed items that were used for preparing or eating meals can become food. Coyotes are opportunistic predators and eat fruit, vegetables, and refuse in addition to their usual prey.

  • Keep your property well-lit at night and use motion lights when possible to help alert you to activity outdoors. Placing an electronic motion activated device such as a motion alarm with strobe or motion activated sprinkler may help to discourage wildlife from your property. A radio plugged in to a motion activated outlet may scare away wildlife outside (use caution for outdoor electronics near water sources and avoid setting out where they may be rained on).

  • Make sure that your fence is secure. Check for gaps and openings that even a cat can fit through. Fence heights should be increased to 6 feet when possible and have an angled addition at the top extending outward for an additional 16 to 24 inches at 45 degrees. Coyotes have been known to scale chain-link, so consider options to discourage climbing. Wrought iron bars should be no further apart than 4” inches in width to avoid wildlife squeezing between or even your pet from exiting. You may also consider wrought-iron mesh to cover half way up the fence height, as well. Coyotes can walk on top of brick or cinder block walls, so consider obstructing the top of the wall with lattice, flower pots, etc. (A variance may be required for fences over 6 feet in height.)

For more information on coyote hazing: http://www.culvercitypd.org/Home/ShowDocument?id=12972

 

Can I move an active bird nest? It is in an inconvenient place.

The Migratory Bird Treaty Act of 1918 protects more than 800 birds in North America. The Act protects birds in a wide variety of ways, and that includes their nests. It’s illegal to interfere with an “active nest,” which is defined by California Fish and Wildlife as one that contains eggs or young birds, or is in the process of being built and is capable of holding eggs or young birds (about 1/3 to 1/2 complete) [California Fish and Wildlife Code 3503].

If you come across a bird nest in your yard that has eggs, or see a female sitting on the nest, your options are legally pretty limited, no matter how inconvenient it might be for you. If the nest absolutely must be moved, you’ll need to contact a local rescue organization. Such organizations have or can obtain permits to deal with the situation. Please note that under the law, it is not legal to simply move the nest to another location in your yard. (Additionally, it’s unlikely the parent birds will continue to use it – it will abandon the eggs and try to build another nest.)

 

My complex is conducting a seasonal removal of branches and maintenance of trees. I'm concerned about the bird nests. What are the laws regarding this?

Under the United States Code Title 16, Chapter 7, Subchapter II, the Migratory Bird Treaty Act of 1918,  it is unlawful to pursue, hunt, take, capture, kill or sell birds listed therein ("migratory birds"). Under the California Fish and Wildlife Code 3503, it is unlawful to take, possess, or needlessly destroy the nest or eggs of any bird. These statutes prohibit the removal of all listed species or their parts (feathers, eggs, nests, etc.) from such property. 

Nesting season for birds are usually from April through June. It is recommended to prune and tree-trim in the autumn and winter seasons. The time required for a bird to complete its nesting cycle varies by species, but most birds have active nests for only 2 to 4 weeks. The California Department of Fish and Wildlife defines an "active" nest as one that contains eggs or young birds, or is in the process of being built and is capable of holding eggs or young birds(about 1/3 to 1/2 complete). Postponing the cutting or trimming of trees could address this issue with a relatively short delay.

 

When can I legally move a bird nest?

The Migratory Bird Treaty Act of 1918 protects more than 800 birds in North America. The Act protects birds in a wide variety of ways, and that includes their nests. It’s illegal to interfere with an “active nest,” which is defined by California Fish and Wildlife as one that contains eggs or young birds, or is in the process of being built and is capable of holding eggs or young birds (about 1/3 to 1/2 complete) [California Fish and Wildlife Code 3503].

The only times you can legally move a bird nest are before it gets too far along (a few materials such as sticks to about 1/3 complete) and when the birds are done nesting. Most birds take several days to build a nest, so if you catch it early, go ahead and remove it. Then, find a way to block off the area so the birds don’t return. It’s not uncommon for some species to re-use their nests, whether in the same season or the following year. Sometimes, other species will move in after the original builders have left. And the nest parts may even be scavenged by other birds for building their own nests. Whenever possible, just leave an old bird nest where you find it. If you have to move it, be sure the birds are gone, there are no babies or eggs, and no new birds have moved in. 

 

Birds are swooping and "dive-bombing" the area. What can I do?

The Migratory Bird Treaty Act of 1918 protects more than 800 birds in North America. The act protects birds in a wide variety of ways, and that includes their nests. Like most animals, hawks and other swooping birds instinctively protect its territory, particularly during breeding time. The birds are protecting their nests, eggs or young birds from potential intruders. Most birds will swoop within 100 to 150 feet of its nest. Its territory may include your backyard, the park across the road or the local schoolyard. If the bird perceives you to be a potential threat, it may swoop. The likelihood of an attack is increased if it is teased or feels threatened in any way.

Birds use scare tactics to defend its territory:

  • Swooping is the most common defense behavior. The birds’ aim is to threaten or bluff and the intention is only to ward off intruders.
  • Beak clacking is part of its defense strategy.
  • In a strike attack, a hawk usually swoops, hovers momentarily and then strikes. The fluttering of wings as the bird hovers can be a warning to duck your head to avoid the attack.

Ways to avoid swooping that may work

  • Avoid the swoop area – try walking or riding in a different direction.
  • Cyclists should always wear a helmet. It is better to dismount and walk your bike past a swoop area.
  • Put up warning signs for others who may not be aware that there are swooping birds in the area.
  • Travel in a group. Most birds only swoop individuals.
  • Be confident and face a swooping bird; usually the bird only attacks people facing away from it.
  • Do not panic and run. It will only encourage a swooping bird to continue its attack.
  • Wear a hat in an area where there are swooping birds.
  • Erect a pop-up tent over the area to prevent contact by the swooping bird.
  • Holding a stick or umbrella over your head will often cause the bird to keep its distance.

 

There are bees in my yard. What can I do?

Culver City Animal Services does not handle calls regarding insects such as bees, wasps, ants, and hornets or their removal.

If you have a problem with bees, DO NOT ATTEMPT TO KILL OR REMOVE THE BEES YOURSELF.

  1. For Multiple Stinging Emergencies (victim involved), call 911.
  2. Honey Bee Swarms or Nests (outside of a building; not within a structure:
    • Contact the Los Angeles County West Vector & Vector-Borne Disease Control District at 1-800-825-3400.
    • The Los Angeles County West Vector Control District provides non-structural bee control at no charge within Culver City
  3. Honey Bee Swarms or Nests (inside a building or structure)
    • Contact a private licensed structural pest control operator. Only a licensed pest control operator can exterminate or relocate bees in or on a structure.
  4. Africanized Honey Bee
    • Contact the Africanized Honey Bee Information at 1-800-BEE-WARY or 1-800-233-9279.
  5. Wasps and Hornets
    • Contact a private licensed structural pest control operator. Only a licensed pest control operator can exterminate or relocate wasps and hornets in or on a structure.

Can I have a chicken in Culver City?

The City of Culver City and Culver City Animal Services have restrictions on the types of animals that can be kept in the city. Before acquiring any animal other than a dog or cat, be sure to check with Culver City Animal Services to make sure you can legally keep the animal in your neighborhood. Generally speaking, the following are illegal: all poisonous snakes and reptiles including alligators and similar animals; all primates; all bears; all California state prohibited non-native animals including ferrets, hedgehogs, sugar gliders, monkeys, and Quaker parakeets; all wild or exotic cats including hybrids; all wild canines and hybrids such as wolf crosses; and all wild native and exotic animals such as raccoons, skunks, otters, opossums, bats, deer, and antelopes. You may be approved for an exotic animal or a non-domestic animal under certain circumstances for certain species or breeds only if there are no prior complaints on your animals, if you meet all the requirements for the Animal Permit, and if the Culver City Permit Application is officially approved [Culver City Municipal Code 9.01.025]. It shall be unlawful for any person to keep or maintain, or have in possession or under control, any animals, fowl or reptiles, other than household pets, in Culver City, without having applied for and received an officially approved Culver City Animal Permit. The Culver City Animal Permit shall be revocable at any time it is made to appear to the City Council that the keeping of such animals, fowl or reptiles is, or may become, detrimental to the public health safety, and/or general welfare [Culver City Municipal Code 9.01.015]. You will need to apply for a Culver City Animal Permit Application to determine if the animal you are interested in will be permitted.

Application for permit

  • All applications for permits to keep animals, fowl or reptiles shall be filed with the City Clerk, shall be accompanied by a fee of $50.00 and shall state the number and kind of animals, fowl or reptiles as well as such other information required by the City Clerk. Signatures of at least 1 adult resident of each dwelling or apartment unit within a radius of 200 feet, indicating approval or disapproval, shall be appended to such applications. Upon receipt of application, a copy thereof shall be referred to the Culver City Animal Services for investigation and report.
  • Upon receipt of said reports, the City Clerk shall cause notices to be posted within a radius of 200 feet from the address wherein said animals, fowl or reptiles are proposed to be kept, and not more than 50 feet apart. Permit will be granted providing no written objections are filed within ten days and approval is received from the City's health agency and Police Department.

You can obtain the Culver City Animal Permit online:

https://www.culvercity.org/Home/ShowDocument?id=12940

You can complete a Culver City Animal Permit application in person at:

City of Culver City - City Hall
9770 Culver Boulevard
Culver City, California

* City Hall hours are from 7:30 am to 5:30 pm Monday through Friday.
* City Hall is closed on holidays, weekends, and alternating Fridays.

You can request a Culver City Animal Permit application at:

Culver City Animal Services
Culver City Police Department
4040 Duquesne Avenue
Culver City, California 90232

Residents can also e-mail the information or complaint to:

animal.services@culvercity.org

 

Can I have a non-domestic pet such as a pot-bellied pig in Culver City?

The City of Culver City and Culver City Animal Services have restrictions on the types of animals that can be kept in the city. Before acquiring any animal other than a dog or cat, be sure to check with Culver City Animal Services to make sure you can legally keep the animal in your neighborhood. Generally speaking, the following are illegal: all poisonous snakes and reptiles including alligators and similar animals; all primates; all bears; all California state prohibited non-native animals including ferrets, hedgehogs, sugar gliders, monkeys, and Quaker parakeets; all wild or exotic cats including hybrids; all wild canines and hybrids such as wolf crosses; and all wild native and exotic animals such as raccoons, skunks, otters, opossums, bats, deer, and antelopes. You may be approved for an exotic animal or a non-domestic animal under certain circumstances for certain species or breeds only if there are no prior complaints on your animals, if you meet all the requirements for the Animal Permit, and if the Culver City Permit Application is officially approved [Culver City Municipal Code 9.01.025]. It shall be unlawful for any person to keep or maintain, or have in possession or under control, any animals, fowl or reptiles, other than household pets, in Culver City, without having applied for and received an officially approved Culver City Animal Permit. The Culver City Animal Permit shall be revocable at any time it is made to appear to the City Council that the keeping of such animals, fowl or reptiles is, or may become, detrimental to the public health safety, and/or general welfare [Culver City Municipal Code 9.01.015]. You will need to apply for a Culver City Animal Permit Application to determine if the animal you are interested in will be permitted.

Application for permit

  • All applications for permits to keep animals, fowl or reptiles shall be filed with the City Clerk, shall be accompanied by a fee of $50.00 and shall state the number and kind of animals, fowl or reptiles as well as such other information required by the City Clerk. Signatures of at least 1 adult resident of each dwelling or apartment unit within a radius of 200 feet, indicating approval or disapproval, shall be appended to such applications. Upon receipt of application, a copy thereof shall be referred to the Culver City Animal Services for investigation and report.
  • Upon receipt of said reports, the City Clerk shall cause notices to be posted within a radius of 200 feet from the address wherein said animals, fowl or reptiles are proposed to be kept, and not more than 50 feet apart. Permit will be granted providing no written objections are filed within ten days and approval is received from the City's health agency and Police Department.

You can obtain the Culver City Animal Permit online:

https://www.culvercity.org/Home/ShowDocument?id=12940

You can complete a Culver City Animal Permit application in person at:

City of Culver City - City Hall
9770 Culver Boulevard
Culver City, California

* City Hall hours are from 7:30 am to 5:30 pm Monday through Friday.
* City Hall is closed on holidays, weekends, and alternating Fridays.

You can request a Culver City Animal Permit application at:

Culver City Animal Services
Culver City Police Department
4040 Duquesne Avenue
Culver City, California 90232

Residents can also e-mail the information or complaint to:

animal.services@culvercity.org

 

Does Culver City Animal Services rent out humane traps for healthy wildife animals?

Culver City Animal Services does not rent out humane traps for healthy wildlife animals. The California Department of Fish and Wildlife regulations prohibit the relocation of healthy wildlife. Healthy wildlife “trapped in towns or cities or removed from under buildings or otherwise taken or trapped because of human/animal conflict shall be immediately released in the area where trapped or disposed of (euthanized) [California Fish & Wildlife Code 4000, 4001, 4180 and California Code of Regulations Title 14 Section 465.5(g)(1) and 679(f)]. Only authorized wildlife rehabilitators may keep injured or orphaned wildlife and then for only a limited time.

Does Culver City Animal Services trap healthy wildlife animal?

The California Department of Fish and Wildlife regulations prohibit the relocation of healthy wildlife [California Code of Regulations Title 14 Section 465.5(g)(1)]. Healthy wildlife “trapped in towns or cities or removed from under buildings or otherwise taken or trapped because of human/animal conflict shall be immediately released in the area where trapped or disposed of (euthanized) [California Fish & Wildlife Code 4000, 4001, 4180 and California Code of Regulations Title 14 Section 679(f)]. Only authorized wildlife rehabilitators may keep injured or orphaned wildlife and then for only a limited time.

The Culver City Animal Services Officer is not trained in euthanasia techniques. Due to Fish and Wildlife regulation, the Animal Services Officer cannot transport or relocate any healthy wild animal. Therefore, Culver City Animal Services does not provide healthy wildlife removal services. If residents have a routine healthy wildlife animal issue, they should contact a licensed private contractor of their choosing and the residents will be responsible for any cost incurred.

Please contact the California Department of Fish and Game for more information and further details regarding what wildlife animals can be caught and what circumstances are permitted.

These brochures provide suggestions on how to address opossum issues, raccoon issues and skunk issues:

 Skunks: https://www.culvercity.org/home/showdocument?id=12565

 Raccoons: https://www.culvercity.org/Home/ShowDocument?id=12563

 Opossums: https://www.culvercity.org/home/showdocument?id=12567

Can I trap wildlife animals?

Healthy wildlife “trapped in towns or cities or removed from under buildings or otherwise taken or trapped because of human/animal conflict shall be immediately released in the area where trapped or disposed of (euthanized) [California Fish & Wildlife Code 4000, 4001, 4180 and California Code of Regulations Title 14 Section 465.5(g)(1) and 679(f)]. The California Department of Fish and Wildlife regulations prohibit the relocation of healthy wildlife. Only authorized wildlife rehabilitators may keep injured or orphaned wildlife and then for only a limited time. Please contact the California Department of Fish and Wildlife for more information and further details regarding what wildlife animals can be caught and what circumstances are permitted.

What are the requirements for a Culver City Animal Permit?

You may be approved for an exotic animal or a non-domestic animal under certain circumstances for certain species or breeds only if there are no prior complaints on your animals, if you meet all the requirements for the Animal Permit, and if the Culver City Permit Application is officially approved [Culver City Municipal Code 9.01.025]. It shall be unlawful for any person to keep or maintain, or have in possession or under control, any animals, fowl or reptiles, other than household pets, in Culver City, without having applied for and received an officially approved Culver City Animal Permit. The Culver City Animal Permit shall be revocable at any time it is made to appear to the City Council that the keeping of such animals, fowl or reptiles is, or may become, detrimental to the public health safety, and/or general welfare [Culver City Municipal Code 9.01.015]. You will need to apply for a Culver City Animal Permit Application to determine if the animal you are interested in will be permitted.

 

Application for permit

  • All applications for permits to keep animals, fowl or reptiles shall be filed with the City Clerk, shall be accompanied by a fee of $50.00 and shall state the number and kind of animals, fowl or reptiles as well as such other information required by the City Clerk. Signatures of at least 1 adult resident of each dwelling or apartment unit within a radius of 200 feet, indicating approval or disapproval, shall be appended to such applications. Upon receipt of application, a copy thereof shall be referred to the Culver City Animal Services for investigation and report.
  • Upon receipt of said reports, the City Clerk shall cause notices to be posted within a radius of 200 feet from the address wherein said animals, fowl or reptiles are proposed to be kept, and not more than 50 feet apart. Permit will be granted providing no written objections are filed within ten days and approval is received from the City's health agency and Police Department.

You can obtain the Culver City Animal Permit online: https://www.culvercity.org/Home/ShowDocument?id=12940

You can complete a Culver City Animal Permit application in person at:

City of Culver City - City Hall
9770 Culver Boulevard
Culver City, California

* City Hall hours are from 7:30 am to 5:30 pm Monday through Friday.
* City Hall is closed on holidays, weekends, and alternating Fridays.

You can request a Culver City Animal Permit application at:

Culver City Animal Services
Culver City Police Department
4040 Duquesne Avenue
Culver City, California 90232

Residents can also e-mail the information or complaint to:

animal.services@culvercity.org

 

Can I have an exotic animal such as a monkey or a non-native animal such as a ferret, a hedgehog or a sugar glider in Culver City?

The City of Culver City and Culver City Animal Services have restrictions on the types of animals that can be kept in the city. Before acquiring any animal other than a dog or cat, be sure to check with Culver City Animal Services to make sure you can legally keep the animal in your neighborhood. Generally speaking, the following are illegal: all poisonous snakes and reptiles including alligators and similar animals; all primates; all bears; all California state prohibited non-native animals including ferrets, hedgehogs, sugar gliders, monkeys, and Quaker parakeets; all wild or exotic cats including hybrids; all wild canines and hybrids such as wolf crosses; and all wild native and exotic animals such as raccoons, skunks, otters, opossums, bats, deer, and antelopes. You may be approved for an exotic animal or a non-domestic animal under certain circumstances for certain species or breeds only if there are no prior complaints on your animals, if you meet all the requirements for the Animal Permit, and if the Culver City Permit Application is officially approved [Culver City Municipal Code 9.01.025]. It shall be unlawful for any person to keep or maintain, or have in possession or under control, any animals, fowl or reptiles, other than household pets, in Culver City, without having applied for and received an officially approved Culver City Animal Permit. The Culver City Animal Permit shall be revocable at any time it is made to appear to the City Council that the keeping of such animals, fowl or reptiles is, or may become, detrimental to the public health safety, and/or general welfare [Culver City Municipal Code 9.01.015]. You will need to apply for a Culver City Animal Permit Application to determine if the animal you are interested in will be permitted.

Application for permit

  • All applications for permits to keep animals, fowl or reptiles shall be filed with the City Clerk, shall be accompanied by a fee of $50.00 and shall state the number and kind of animals, fowl or reptiles as well as such other information required by the City Clerk. Signatures of at least 1 adult resident of each dwelling or apartment unit within a radius of 200 feet, indicating approval or disapproval, shall be appended to such applications. Upon receipt of application, a copy thereof shall be referred to the Culver City Animal Services for investigation and report.
  • Upon receipt of said reports, the City Clerk shall cause notices to be posted within a radius of 200 feet from the address wherein said animals, fowl or reptiles are proposed to be kept, and not more than 50 feet apart. Permit will be granted providing no written objections are filed within ten days and approval is received from the City's health agency and Police Department.

You can obtain the Culver City Animal Permit online: https://www.culvercity.org/Home/ShowDocument?id=12940

You can complete a Culver City Animal Permit application in person at:

City of Culver City - City Hall
9770 Culver Boulevard
Culver City, California

* City Hall hours are from 7:30 am to 5:30 pm Monday through Friday.
* City Hall is closed on holidays, weekends, and alternating Fridays.

You can request a Culver City Animal Permit application at:

Culver City Animal Services
Culver City Police Department
4040 Duquesne Avenue
Culver City, California 90232

Residents can also e-mail the information or complaint to:

animal.services@culvercity.org

 

There are rats/mice in my yard. What can I do?

Culver City Animal Services does not handle calls regarding rats/mice or their removal. If you are experiencing a rat infestation problem in your home or neighborhood, contact a private licensed pest control operator.

If I see a raccoon/opossum/skunk during the day, doesn't it have rabies? Isn't it nocturnal?

Daylight activity is not a reliable indicator of illness in wild animals. If a wild animal appears healthy and is spotted during the day, it may be unable to return to its den or is looking for food. Although several wild animal species may be primarily nocturnal animals, healthy animals, especially nursing wildlife mothers who have young to feed, will need extra time to forage and thus may be found moving about during the day. As adult wildlife animals will attack and run younger wildlife animals off its territories, the young wildlife animals will come out during the day to forage and then go into hiding when it gets dark and the adult wildlife animals come out.

If the animal is moving in a normal manner (as opposed to walking in circles while falling down), it is likelyhealthy. If left alone, healthy wildlife will eventually return to its dens once it feel safe.

There is a squirrel under my house or in my yard. What can I do?

Despite occasional damage to trees and houses, squirrels are beneficial to the ecosystem through their habit of caching and burying excess food supplies, such as nuts, seeds, and acorns. When squirrels stockpile seeds and nuts for the winter, they always bury more than they need. In the spring, those seeds that were not consumed over the winter will sprout, giving new plant growth to the environment and tree reproduction. Squirrels also carry an important ingredient to the health of the trees. A living organism known as microriza develops and grows in the digestive tract of the squirrel and only found in squirrels. The microriza operate like nematodes in other plants helping plant growth. These is a symbiotic relationship formed and the trees and the microriza help one another to grow. Without the squirrels, some trees could not exist. Squirrels are also important prey animals for many small predators because of their abundance in the habitats in which they live.

Squirrels have powerful, gnawing teeth for eating tough vegetable matter, and they can close their mouths while leaving their front teeth exposed for digging. Their other distinguishing feature is that their teeth never stop growing. They must continue gnawing to wear them down so that they can close their mouths (otherwise they would be unable to take in food and would eventually starve) and so that their teeth do not grow into their skulls, eventually killing them. Tree squirrels damage green and ripe walnuts, almonds, oranges, avocados, apples, strawberries, tomatoes, and grains. Telephone and electrical lines are sometimes gnawed and they also chew on buildings or invade attics through knotholes or uncovered roof vents. Eastern Fox Squirrels can become mildly aggressive and antagonize dogs and may frighten the elderly. Ground squirrels damage many food-bearing and ornamental plants. Particularly vulnerable are grains, nut and fruit trees such as: almond, apple, apricot, orange, peach, pistachio, prune, and walnut. Ground squirrels will enter gardens and devour vegetables in the seedling stage. They may damage young shrubs, vines, and trees by gnawing bark, eating twigs and leaves, and burrowing around roots. Ground squirrels will gnaw on plastic sprinkler heads and irrigation lines. They will also consume the eggs of ground-nesting birds. The burrowing of Ground squirrels also can be quite destructive. Burrows around trees and shrubs can damage and desiccate roots, and sometimes topple trees. Burrows beneath buildings and other structures sometimes necessitate repair.

Wildlife is an important part of our environment. Squirrels, raccoons, rabbits, opossums, skunks, mallard ducks, Canada geese, and foxes can all be found in Culver City. They have adapted to or have found the modification we have made to the area appealing. While these animals are seldom a threat to people or domestic animals, there are several steps you can take to discourage wild animals from becoming a recurring problem. Squirrels are attracted to urban areas by the easy accessibility of food, water and shelter. Eliminating the availability of all these factors will encourage squirrels to leave. Prevention is the key to dealing with these wildlife nuisances and is the best all around solution to the problem both for the people and the wildlife. Addressing a problem requires much more work than prevention and is not nearly as satisfactory or effective.

  1. Install a motion-activated or motion-sensored sprinkler device. When triggered by motion, the motion-activated sprinkler device will turn towards the intruder and deliver a 3-second burst of water. The combination of the water spray, noise, and the motion of the sprinkler head is often effective at scaring off animal intruders and deterring skunks from specific areas near your home or garden. Check online for videos of the motion-sensored sprinkler system in action. You can purchase the device in home improvement stores, in pet stores or online.
  2. Use metal or heavy plastic trash containers with tight fitting lids. Secure the lids with bungee cords, rope or sturdy cords. You may want to soak the cords or rope in hot sauce or commercial repellent. Spray a small amount of ammonia in and around all garbage cans. You may want to pour a cup of ammonia in the trash can every week after the trash has been picked up. Animals don't like the smell and will be discouraged from digging around in your trash. Most animals invade human space when searching and foraging for food. If the food supply is easier to obtain elsewhere, the animals are more likely to leave your property alone.
  3. Each fall and spring, inspect the exterior of your home for entrances that wildlife animals can use to get into the crawl space under your house. A squirrel does not need a large hole to enter. Make sure soffit vents and gable end vents are fastened securely. If you find vent grills open or crawl spaces open under your house, you will need to secure the openings to prevent the easy access. You can attach ¼-inch hardware cloth over the vent on the inside of the attic for extra security. Plug gaps between your foundations and sill plates. Cover foundation vents with slotted metal vent covers.
  4. If squirrels take up residence under a low deck, they may be excluded by using ¼-inch grid screening or solid metal flashing. Trench around the perimeter of the deck a minimum of 12 inches deep, insert screening in trench, and backfill. Attach top of screening to facade of deck with nails or fence post staples. Squirrels can be excluded from buildings by covering foundation vents with slotted metal vent covers and by using ¼-inch grid screening to cover attic vents and chimneys. Before completing final seal on the last entry point, make sure no animals are trapped inside. On the night before completing repairs, sprinkle flour in the entrance hole and check for tracks the following morning. If no tracks are evident for three consecutive nights, no animals are likely present. You can also place crumpled newspaper into the opening to see if any animal is pushing it out or in as an indicator for the continual presence of the animal. You may wish to make a temporary one-way exit using ¼-inch grid screening. Form the screening into a cone or funnel shape that will permit animals to leave but not to reenter. The large end should be sized to encircle the entry hole and be attached over the hole to the facade of the deck or building with nails or fence post staples. The small end should face away from the house and be 4 to 6 inches in diameter.
  5. Pet food is high protein, carbohydrates and fats. By having your pet's food available to the animals, it discourages them from their normal hunting and foraging behavior and will keep them returning to your property and yard. Pets should be fed during daylight hours and any leftovers removed immediately. Empty or remove the water bowls at night. Be sure to lock pet doors and openings at night.
  6. If you have vegetables in your garden or fruit trees in your yard, use a basic wire fence to surround your low-lying plants as they ripen and pick up all fruit when it drops off the tree. If you leave it exposed, it is just another food source for the squirrels. Cage your plant bulbs. Before planting bulbs, set homemade or store-bought metal cages into planting holes. Alternatively, place a wire mesh over the entire bed once you've finished planting. Various barriers—chicken wire, hardware cloth, 1” to 2” metal mesh—can be spread over the ground and cut to fit around plant stems. You may also consider completely covering over newly planted vegetables with a chicken wire fence or completely caging-off your garden bushes and small trees before the fruit ripen.
  7. Cover telephone and electric wires near the house with long plastic tubing to discourage use of the wires for entrance and exit. The best deterrent, besides removing the food source, is the installation of a 12” wide band of sheet metal (metal guard) and disc or cone baffles. To prevent squirrels from climbing trees, poles, and other vertical structures, install a metal or heavy plastic barrier 6 to 8 feet above the ground. A metal guard can be secured around trees, pipes, posts, and other structures to keep raccoons from climbing. It can be made from a piece of aluminum flashing or sheet metal, held together with wire, nails, or screws, and painted to blend in. 24-inch long aluminum or galvanized vent-pipe can serve as a pre-made barrier around a narrow support. A funnel-shaped piece of aluminum flashing can be fitted around a tree or other vertical structure. The outside edge of the flared metal should be at least 18 inches away from the support. Cut the material with tin snips and file down sharp edges. Squirrels will attempt to use surrounding trees or structures as an avenue to access the area above the barrier. Prune branches 6 feet away from the ground and from the roof of your property. Make sure no other trees are close enough to provide jumping access. This prevents the squirrels from scaling the tree trunk or accessing the branches, fruits, leaves and nuts. Keep squirrels away from roof areas by trimming tree branches 10 feet from roof and keeping climbing plants trimmed away from roof and eave areas.
  8. Disc baffle and pipe sleeves prevent squirrels from traveling on utility line wires, transformers, bird feeders and other aerial sites that have horizontal wires leading to them. Cut the plastic or PVC pipe lengthwise, spread it open, and place it over the wire. The sleeves should fit loosely so they rotate as the squirrels tries to traverse them. Sleeves should be at least 24 inches long. Disc baffles or metal collars should be at least 18 inches to 2 feet wide and placed 6 feet to 8 feet above the ground. Collar edges should overlap and connect by springs to allow for tree growth.
  9. If you wish to have someone trap and remove the squirrel, you can hire a private nuisance wildlife control operator which generally can be found in the Yellow Pages under “Animal Removal Services.” If you do consider a professional wildlife removal specialist who has the required permits to legally trap and remove wildlife, please keep in mind that removal of nuisance wildlife does not necessarily mean that you have removed the problem. Oftentimes, removing the animal just opens up space for another animal to move in and claim territory. However, your best solution would be to make your home and property inhospitable and unappealing to the unwanted animals with habitat modifications and exclusion methods.

The California Department of Fish and Wildlife regulations prohibit the relocation of squirrels or other healthy wildlife. Healthy wildlife “trapped in towns or cities or removed from under buildings or otherwise taken or trapped because of human/animal conflict shall be immediately released in the area where trapped or disposed of (euthanized) [California Fish & Wildlife Code 4000, 4001, 4180 and California Code of Regulations Title 14 Section 465.5(g)(1) and 679(f)]. Only authorized wildlife rehabilitators may keep injured or orphaned wildlife and then for only a limited time. Ground squirrels are classified as nongame mammals by the California Fish and Wildlife Code. Tree squirrels are classified as game mammals by the California Fish and Wildlife Code and can be controlled only as provided by hunting regulations (Section 4181).

Nongame mammals injuring growing crops or other property may be controlled in any legal manner by the owner or tenant.

The Culver City Animal Services Officer is not trained in euthanasia techniques. Due to Fish and Wildlife regulation, the Animal Services Officer cannot transport or relocate any healthy wild animal. Therefore, Culver City Animal Services does not provide healthy squirrel removal services. If residents have a routine healthy wildlife squirrel issue, they should contact a licensed private contractor of their choosing and the resident will be responsible for any cost incurred.

The Culver City Animal Services Officer will respond to calls for service ONLY if the squirrel is inside the living residence (not in a trap, not under or around the house and not in the attic or crawlspaces), is sick, is injured, is orphaned (for babies and the young), or is deceased.

For a brochure on how to address squirrel issues: https://www.culvercity.org/Home/ShowDocument?id=12462

There is an opossum under my house or in my yard. What can I do?

Opossums are beneficial to the environment: eating the harmful, unwanted pests around your home such as snails, slugs, spiders, cockroaches, rats, mice and snakes. When opossums live in or near inhabited buildings, the animals’ smelly nesting habits and discharge of anal fluids can cause offensive odors. Opossums can damage buildings by pushing in screened vents or window screens, scattering insulation, and chewing electrical wiring. They frequently get into garbage.

Wildlife is an important part of our environment. Opossums, squirrels, rabbits, raccoons, skunks, mallard ducks, Canada geese, and foxes can all be found in Culver City. They have adapted to or have found the modification we have made to the area appealing. While these animals are seldom a threat to people or domestic animals, there are several steps you can take to discourage wild animals from becoming a recurring problem. Opossums are attracted to urban areas by the easy accessibility of food, water and shelter. Eliminating the availability of all these factors will encourage the opossums to leave. Prevention is the key to dealing with these wildlife nuisances and is the best all around solution to the problem both for the people and the wildlife. Addressing a problem requires much more work than prevention and is not nearly as satisfactory or effective.

  1. Install a motion-activated or motion-sensored sprinkler device. When triggered by motion, the motion-activated sprinkler device will turn towards the intruder and deliver a 3-second burst of water. The combination of the water spray, noise, and the motion of the sprinkler head is often effective at scaring off animal intruders and deterring skunks from specific areas near your home or garden. Check online for videos of the motion-sensored sprinkler system in action. You can purchase the device in home improvement stores, in pet stores or online.
  2. Use metal or heavy plastic trash containers with tight fitting lids. Secure the lids with bungee cords, rope or sturdy cords. You may want to soak the cords or rope in hot sauce or commercial repellent. Spray a small amount of ammonia in and around all garbage cans. You may want to pour a cup of ammonia in the trash can every week after the trash has been picked up. Animals don't like the smell and will be discouraged from digging around in your trash. Most animals invade human space when searching and foraging for food. If the food supply is easier to obtain elsewhere, the animals are more likely to leave your property alone.
  3. Pet food is high in protein, carbohydrates and fats. By having your pet's food available to the animals, it discourages them from their normal hunting and foraging behavior and will keep them returning to your property and yard. Pets should be fed during daylight hours and any leftovers removed immediately. Empty or remove the water bowls at night. Be sure to lock pet doors and openings at night.
  4. If opossums take up residence under a low deck, they may be excluded by using ¼-inch grid screening or solid metal flashing. Trench around the perimeter of the deck a minimum of 12 inches deep, insert screening in trench, and backfill. Attach top of screening to facade of deck with nails or fence post staples. Opossums can be excluded from buildings by covering foundation vents with slotted metal vent covers and by using ¼-inch grid screening to cover attic vents and chimneys. Before completing final seal on the last entry point, make sure no animals are trapped inside. On the night before completing repairs, sprinkle flour in the entrance hole and check for tracks the following morning. If no tracks are evident for three consecutive nights, no animals are likely present. You can also place crumpled newspaper into the opening to see if any animal is pushing it out or in as an indicator for the continual presence of the animal. You may wish to make a temporary one-way exit using ¼-inch grid screening. Form the screening into a cone or funnel shape that will permit animals to leave but not to reenter. The large end should be sized to encircle the entry hole and be attached over the hole to the facade of the deck or building with nails or fence post staples. The small end should face away from the house and be 4 to 6 inches in diameter.
  5. To ensure that the animals are not under your house before doing so, you can also place one to two rags soaked in ammonia in each of the crawl spaces or entrances and wait 36 to 48 hours. The fumes emitted are noxious to the animals and the animals will likely vacate the area. 6. Keep in mind that opossums are good climbers. Fix any openings or weak or loose places. Opossums may be kept away from roof areas by trimming tree branches 10 feet from roof and by keeping climbing plants trimmed away from roof and eave areas.
  6. If you wish to have someone trap and remove the opossums, you can hire a private nuisance wildlife control operator which generally can be found in the Yellow Pages under “Animal Removal Services.” If you do consider a professional wildlife removal specialist who has the required permits to legally trap and remove wildlife, please keep in mind that removal of nuisance wildlife does not necessarily mean that you have removed the problem. Oftentimes, removing the animal just opens up space for another animal to move in and claim territory. However, your best solution would be to make your home and property inhospitable and unappealing to the unwanted animals with habitat modifications and exclusion methods.

The California Department of Fish and Wildlife regulations prohibit the relocation of healthy wildlife. Healthy wildlife “trapped in towns or cities or removed from under buildings or otherwise taken or trapped because of human/animal conflict shall be immediately released in the area where trapped or disposed of (euthanized) [California Fish & Wildlife Code 4000, 4001, 4180 and California Code of Regulations Title 14 Section 465.5(g)(1) and 679(f)]. Only authorized wildlife rehabilitators may keep injured or orphaned wildlife and then for only a limited time.

The Culver City Animal Services Officer is not trained in euthanasia techniques. Due to Fish and Wildlife regulation, the Animal Services Officer cannot transport or relocate any healthy wild animal. Therefore, Culver City Animal Services does not provide healthy wildlife removal services. If residents have a routine healthy wildlife animal issue, they should contact a licensed private contractor of their choosing and the resident will be responsible for any cost incurred.

The Culver City Animal Services Officer will respond to calls for service ONLY if the opossum is inside the living residence (not in a trap, not under or around the house and not in the attic or crawlspaces), is sick, is injured, or is deceased.

For a brochure on how to address opossum issues: https://www.culvercity.org/home/showdocument?id=12567

There is a raccoon under my house or in my yard. What can I do?

In urban areas, raccoons can damage buildings (particularly attics and roofs), gardens, fruit trees, lawns, garbage cans, and trash containers. They are also attracted to pet food left outdoors and will attack pets. Occasionally, one or more raccoons will establish a communal toilet area. In rural areas, raccoons may feed on farm crops or raid poultry houses.

Wildlife is an important part of our environment. Raccoons, squirrels, rabbits, opossums, skunks, mallard ducks, Canada geese, and foxes can all be found in Culver City. They have adapted to or have found the modification we have made to the area appealing. While these animals are seldom a threat to people or domestic animals, there are several steps you can take to discourage wild animals from becoming a recurring problem. Raccoons are attracted to urban areas by the easy accessibility of food, water and shelter. Eliminating the availability of all these factors will encourage the raccoons to leave. Prevention is the key to dealing with these wildlife nuisances and is the best all around solution to the problem both for the people and the wildlife. Addressing a problem requires much more work than prevention and is not nearly as satisfactory or effective.

  1. Install a motion-activated or motion-sensored sprinkler device. When triggered by motion, the motion-activated sprinkler device will turn towards the intruder and deliver a 3-second burst of water. The combination of the water spray, noise, and the motion of the sprinkler head is often effective at scaring off animal intruders and deterring skunks from specific areas near your home or garden. Check online for videos of the motion-sensored sprinkler system in action. You can purchase the device in home improvement stores, in pet stores or online.
  2. Use metal or heavy plastic trash containers with tight fitting lids. Secure the lids with bungee cords, rope or sturdy cords. You may want to soak the cords or rope in hot sauce or commercial repellent. Spray a small amount of ammonia in and around all garbage cans. You may want to pour a cup of ammonia in the trash can every week after the trash has been picked up. Animals don't like the smell and will be discouraged from digging around in your trash. Most animals invade human space when searching and foraging for food. If the food supply is easier to obtain elsewhere, the animals are more likely to leave your property alone.
  3. Each fall and spring, inspect the exterior of your home for entrances wildlife can use to get into the crawl space under your house. Even a raccoon does not need a large hole to enter. Make sure soffit vents and gable end vents are fastened securely. If you find vent grills open or crawl spaces open under your house, you will need to secure the openings to prevent the easy access. You can attach ¼-inch hardware cloth over the vent on the inside of the attic for extra security. Plug any gaps between your foundations and sill plates. Cover foundation vents with slotted metal vent covers.
  4. Pet food is high in protein, carbohydrates and fats. By having your pet's food available to the animals, it discourages them from their normal hunting and foraging behavior and will keep them returning to your property and yard. Pets should be fed during daylight hours and any leftovers removed immediately. Empty or remove the water bowls at night. Be sure to lock pet doors and openings at night.
  5. If raccoons take up residence under a low deck, they may be excluded by using ¼-inch grid screening or solid metal flashing. Trench around the perimeter of the deck at least 12 inchesdeep, insert screening in trench, and backfill. Attach top of screening to facade of deck with nails or fence post staples. Before completing final seal on the last entry point, make sure no animals are trapped inside. On the night before completing repairs, sprinkle flour in the entrance hole and check for tracks the following morning. You can also place one to two rags soaked in ammonia in the entrance hole and wait 36 to 48 hours. If no tracks are evident for 3 consecutive nights, no animals are likely present. You can also place crumpled newspaper into the opening to see if any animal is pushing it out or in as an indicator for the continual presence of the animal. You may wish to make a temporary one-way exit using ¼-inch grid screening. Form the screening into a cone or funnel shape that will permit animals to leave but not to reenter. The large end should be sized to encircle the entry hole and be attached over the hole to the facade of the deck or building with nails or fence post staples. The small end should face away from the house and be 4 to 6 inches in diameter.
  6. Raccoons are good climbers and strong animals capable of pushing or pulling objects with considerable force. However, they are not inclined to break through walls or fences that are intact and in good condition. Fix any openings and weak or loose places. Keep raccoons away from roof areas by trimming tree branches 10 feet from roof and keeping climbing plants trimmed away from roof and eave areas.
  7. Raccoons digging in your yard do not necessarily indicate that you have a raccoon problem. You may actually have an insect problem in your lawn. Sod webworm and other larvae are abundant and the raccoons are taking care of the problem for you. Call your local garden center and inquire how to effectively manage your insect problem. Removing the insect infestation will remove the raccoon's food source and thereby the raccoons.
  8. If you wish to have someone trap and remove the raccoon, you can hire a private nuisance wildlife control operator which generally can be found in the Yellow Pages under “Animal Removal Services.” If you do consider a professional wildlife removal specialist who has the required permits to legally trap and remove wildlife, please keep in mind that removal of nuisance wildlife does not necessarily mean that you have removed the problem. Oftentimes, removing the animal just opens up space for another animal to move in and claim territory. However, your best solution would be to make your home and property inhospitable and unappealing to the unwanted animals with habitat modifications and exclusion methods.

The California Department of Fish and Wildlife regulations prohibit the relocation of healthy wildlife. Healthy wildlife “trapped in towns or cities or removed from under buildings or otherwise taken or trapped because of human/animal conflict shall be immediately released in the area where trapped or disposed of (euthanized) [California Fish & Wildlife Code 4000, 4001, 4180 and California Code of Regulations Title 14 Section 465.5(g)(1) and 679(f)]. Only authorized wildlife rehabilitators may keep injured or orphaned wildlife and then for only a limited time.

The Culver City Animal Services Officer is not trained in euthanasia techniques. Due to Fish and Wildlife regulation, the Animal Services Officer cannot transport or relocate any healthy wild animal. Therefore, Culver City Animal Services does not provide healthy wildlife removal services. If residents have a routine healthy wildlife animal issue, they should contact a licensed private contractor of their choosing and the resident will be responsible for any cost incurred.

The Culver City Animal Services Officer will respond to calls for service ONLY if the raccoon is inside the living residence (not in a trap, not under or around the house and not in the attic or crawlspaces), is sick, is injured, or is deceased.

For a brochure on how to address raccoon issues: https://www.culvercity.org/Home/ShowDocument?id=12563

There is a skunk under my house or in my yard. What can I do?

Many people consider skunks odorous, obnoxious pests which should be avoided at all costs. However, these animals have some beneficial habits; they kill insects and rodents. Skunks become a problem when their activities conflict with human interests. When skunks take shelter under homes, decks, or in garages, their presence is not usually tolerated by occupants of the building.

The following steps are suggested for removing skunks under your house:

1. Seal all possible entrances, except one (the main entrance).

2. Sprinkle a band of flour 2 feet wide on the ground in front of the remaining opening.

3. Place a light or strobe under the building; skunks do not like bright light. There are strobe lights

available for skunks, rats and other pest animals. Search online under “rodent strobe.”

4. After dark, check for tracks on the band of flour.

5. When tracks indicate the skunk has departed the building (but not returned!), close the last entrance.

Wildlife is an important part of our environment. Skunks, squirrels, rabbits, opossums, raccoons, mallard ducks, Canada geese, and foxes can all be found in Culver City. They have adapted to or have found the modification we have made to the area appealing. While these animals are seldom a threat to people or domestic animals, there are several steps you can take to discourage wild animals from becoming a recurring problem. Skunks are attracted to urban areas by the easy accessibility of food, water and shelter. Eliminating the availability of all these factors will encourage skunks to leave. Prevention is the key to dealing with these wildlife nuisances and is the best all around solution to the problem both for the people and the wildlife. Addressing a problem requires much more work than prevention and is not nearly as satisfactory or effective.

  1. Install a motion-activated or motion-sensored sprinkler device. When triggered by motion, the motion-activated sprinkler device will turn towards the intruder and deliver a 3-second burst of water. The combination of the water spray, noise, and the motion of the sprinkler head is often effective at scaring off animal intruders and deterring skunks from specific areas near your home or garden. Check online for videos of the motion-sensored sprinkler system in action. You can purchase the device in home improvement stores, in pet stores or online.
  2. Use metal or heavy plastic trash containers with tight fitting lids. Secure the lids with bungee cords, rope or sturdy cords. You may want to soak the cords or rope in hot sauce or commercial repellent. Spray a small amount of ammonia in and around all garbage cans. You may want to pour a cup of ammonia in the trash can every week after the trash has been picked up. Animals don't like the smell and will be discouraged from digging around in your trash. Most animals invade human space when searching and foraging for food. If the food supply is easier to obtain elsewhere, the animals are more likely to leave your property alone.
  3. Each fall and spring, inspect the exterior of your home for entrances wildlife can use to get into the crawl space under your house. Even a skunk does not need a large hole to enter. Make sure soffit vents and gable end vents are fastened securely. If you find vent grills open or crawl spaces open under your house, you will need to secure the openings to prevent the easy access. You can attach ¼-inch hardware cloth over the vent on the inside of the attic for extra security. Plug any gaps between your foundations and sill plates. Cover foundation vents with slotted metal vent covers.
  4. If skunks take up residence under a low deck, they may be excluded by using ¼-inch grid screening or solid metal flashing. Trench around the perimeter of the deck a minimum of 12 inches deep, insert screening in trench, and backfill. Attach top of screening to facade of deck with nails or fence post staples. Before completing final seal on the last entry point, it is wise to make sure no animals are trapped inside. On the night before completing repairs, sprinkle flour in the entrance hole and check for tracks the following morning. If no tracks are evident for three consecutive nights, no animals are likely present. You can also place crumpled newspaper into the opening to see if any animal is pushing it out or in as an indicator for the continual presence of the animal. You may wish to make a temporary one-way exit using ¼-inch grid screening. Form the screening into a cone or funnel shape that will permit animals to leave but not to reenter. The large end should be sized to encircle the entry hole and be attached over the hole to the facade of the deck or building with nails or fence post staples. The small end should face away from the house and be 4 to 6 inches in diameter.
  5. Skunks are not inclined to break through walls or fences that are intact and in reasonably good condition. Fix any openings or weak or loose places. It’s much easier to prevent skunks from taking refuge under your deck or in burrows around your home than to deal with the problem. Skunks like to dig at the edge or the corner of a building or structure. You can discourage this behavior by placing hardware cloth six inches beneath the ground surface. Extend it out away from the base of your deck, tool shed foundation or other applicable structure by at least three feet. Most critters will prefer to dig right next to the structure and when they can’t get through the hardware cloth, they will go somewhere else. The hardware cloth can then be covered by lattice work, or other cosmetic treatments, to improve the appearance.
  6. Pet food is high in protein, carbohydrates and fats. By having your pet's food available, it discourages skunks from their normal hunting and foraging behavior and will keep the skunks returning to your property and yard. Pets should be fed during daylight hours and any leftovers removed immediately. Empty or remove the water bowls at night. Be sure to lock pet doors and openings at night.
  7. Skunks digging in your yard do not necessarily indicate that you have a skunk problem. You may actually have an insect problem in your lawn. Sod webworm and other larvae are abundant and the skunks are taking care of the problem for you. Call your local garden center and inquire how to effectively manage your insect problem. Removing the insect infestation will remove the skunks’ food source and thereby the skunks.
  8. If you wish to have someone trap and remove the skunk, you can hire a private nuisance wildlife control operator which generally can be found in the Yellow Pages under “Animal Removal Services.” If you do consider a professional wildlife removal specialist who has the required permits to legally trap and remove wildlife, please keep in mind that removal of nuisance wildlife does not necessarily mean that you have removed the problem. Oftentimes, removing the animal just opens up space for another animal to move in and claim territory. However, your best solution would be to make your home and property inhospitable and unappealing to the unwanted animals with habitat modifications and exclusion methods.

The California Department of Fish and Wildlife regulations prohibit the relocation of healthy wildlife. Healthy wildlife “trapped in towns or cities or removed from under buildings or otherwise taken or trapped because of human/animal conflict shall be immediately released in the area where trapped or disposed of (euthanized) [California Fish & Wildlife Code 4000, 4001, 4180 and California Code of Regulations Title 14 Section 465.5(g)(1) and 679(f)]. Only authorized wildlife rehabilitators may keep injured or orphaned wildlife and then for only a limited time.

The Culver City Animal Services Officer is not trained in euthanasia techniques. Due to Fish and Wildlife regulation, the Animal Services Officer cannot transport or relocate any healthy wild animal. Therefore, Culver City Animal Services does not provide healthy wildlife removal services. If residents have a routine healthy wildlife animal issue, they should contact a licensed private contractor of their choosing and the resident will be responsible for any cost incurred.

The Culver City Animal Services Officer will respond to calls for service ONLY if the skunk is inside the living residence (not in a trap, not under or around the house and not in the attic or crawlspaces), is sick, is injured, or is deceased.

For a brochure on how to address skunk issues: https://www.culvercity.org/home/showdocument?id=12565